October 21, 2020, 04:24:18 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Our new place: www.tajikam.com/forums

To enter with your registered details click here and follow the steps: http://tajikam.com/forums/index.php?app=core&module=global§ion=lostpass
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3
  Print  
Author Topic: Ethnic Cleansing of Tajiks in Afghanistan  (Read 20219 times)
Ahhangar
Ahhangar
Research Team
Hero Member
*

Karma: +24/-0
Offline Offline

Posts: 655



View Profile Email
« on: July 06, 2008, 12:01:10 PM »

This thread will be dedicated to documenting all the instances where assaults have taken place against the Tajiks of Afghanistan on the basis of ethnicity.

It is the duty of all Tajiks of Afghanistan and elsewhere to learn about these occurrences and  to recognize the ideologies and followers of those ideologies which have committed such acts against the Tajiks of Afghanistan - so that they can ensure that it does not repeat itself.


Read the following reports about the Taliban actions against the civilian population of the Shamali (Area immediately north of Kabul - covering Parwan Kapisa)


Afghan rulers drive 130,000 from homes The Taliban, who want a UN seat, have been killing and burning in their own land


Barry Bearak, in Bazarak eastern Afghanistan. The Guardian. Manchester (UK): Oct 20, 1999. pg. 18
Abstract (Summary)

They feel sheepish about complaining, so they lead the way to the worse off, the irretrievably broken or the unbearably sorrowful: the children whose parents were killed before their eyes, or men whose wives were carried off screaming.

This is the human wreckage left behind by the binge of blood lust and mayhem unleashed this summer by the Taliban militia who rule Afghanistan, and thousands of Pakistani followers lit with the fervour of supposed jihad.

Among the survivors are an estimated 65,000 refugees who have escaped to the Panjshir valley, a nape of land nestled in the Himalayan peaks of the Hindu Kush. Huddled in makeshift tents of cloth and plastic, relentlessly foraging for firewood, they are free for now from their tormentors but not yet safe from the furious winds and snows of winter.

Full Text

Those who only had their houses burned or crops destroyed often apologise because their story is not bad enough.

They feel sheepish about complaining, so they lead the way to the worse off, the irretrievably broken or the unbearably sorrowful: the children whose parents were killed before their eyes, or men whose wives were carried off screaming.

Or the old woman whose story no one is sure of, who has been sobbing now for two months, fingering a red flower embroidered on a pink cloth.

This is the human wreckage left behind by the binge of blood lust and mayhem unleashed this summer by the Taliban militia who rule Afghanistan, and thousands of Pakistani followers lit with the fervour of supposed jihad.

Killing wantonly, emptying entire towns, machine-gunning livestock, sawing down fruit trees, blasting apart irrigation canals: the destructive spree by the militia is described in consistent detail by witnesses.

Among the survivors are an estimated 65,000 refugees who have escaped to the Panjshir valley, a nape of land nestled in the Himalayan peaks of the Hindu Kush. Huddled in makeshift tents of cloth and plastic, relentlessly foraging for firewood, they are free for now from their tormentors but not yet safe from the furious winds and snows of winter.

The Taliban began their summer offensive in northern Afghanistan on July 28, trying to conquer the only part of the country outside their control.

Their main drive was into the Shamali valley, just north of the capital, Kabul. At least 6,000 soldiers rolled through towns and villages in what survivors call a well-coordinated assault supported by tanks, artillery and air bombardments.

Within a week the Taliban were celebrating victory, only to be stunned by a night counter-attack by opposition forces under Ahmad Shah Massoud.

The Massoud forces ambushed and killed hundreds, perhaps more than 1,000, of the Taliban, who went on to suffer even more losses in a disorderly retreat, according to reports. But much of the territory recovered was already in ruin.

Dozens of refugees from Guldara, Bagram, Saraykhoja, Karabagh and other towns to the north of Kabul, interviewed independently, told much the same story: people shot in their homes, fires everywhere, beatings.

`Why did they have to kill my cows and goats, and why cut down the mulberry trees and stomp through my garden?" said Mohammed Kasim, 59. He is now a refugee in the eastern town of Bazarak. His home is a tent of thin blankets held up by branches.

Nafas Jon, 45, a gaunt, tired woman with six children, has taken sanctuary with 1,000 others in Bazarak's decrepit little school. `The Taliban took my husband out of the house and cut him down," she said.

`They were killing everyone who looked young, thinking they must be soldiers. I screamed then, and I cry now. We have nothing left.

`We returned once to see our house," she said, pausing a few seconds to frame the memory in her mind. `The ceiling is now on the ground."

To the victims, the purpose of the Taliban's summer offensive was obvious. The militia is largely made up of ethnic Pathans; they wanted to rid the area of ethnic Tajiks, whose resistance to them has been steadfast, and to leave their enemies with nothing.

Taliban leaders say that their campaign was to save a populace living in constant danger because Commander Massoud's forces, the so- called United Front, used the towns to launch attacks.

To `save" the citizenry, the Taliban forced most to flee; others were trucked to Kabul or the eastern city of Jalalabad.

About 12,500 people - more than 8,000 of them children - are living in the compound of the closed Soviet embassy in Kabul, the UN says. A Massoud official says more than 2,000 Tajik men are locked in the stone caverns of the Pul-i-Charki prison in the city.

There are estimated to be 130,000 refugees in all, the largest concentration in the Panjshir valley. With fighting still going on, the extent of the death and destruction is impossible to measure. Individual accounts are, however, supported by the uniformity of their particulars.

Mohammed Wali, a round-faced boy of 10, poked his head through a crowd to call, `They shot my father, and I saw it."

There had been a hard knocking on their door. His father nervously walked to the gate. Men outside fired Kalashnikovs. With his father dead, he ran inside as fast as he could. His mother, he said, `needed to know about it right away'.

Shakar Gul sat on a rock with her arms around her nephew Gules Tan, 3. `His father was killed, and his mother was taken away. He cries out, `Where is my mother?' We tell him she has gone away but will come back. In time, God willing, he will forget her.

New York Times

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNsx1PKpGXc" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNsx1PKpGXc</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZBVlxyEc5TA" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZBVlxyEc5TA</a>
Logged
Ahhangar
Ahhangar
Research Team
Hero Member
*

Karma: +24/-0
Offline Offline

Posts: 655



View Profile Email
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2008, 12:19:06 PM »

A book was published amongst the diaspora of Afghanistan in Germany;  Da Afgha?nista?n da Kaltur Wade T?olanah.

It refers to the taking of power of Massoud in Kabul 1992 as the second reign of the Water Carrier - the first being the time of Habibulah Kalakani - and the main point of it is that the Tajik population just to the north of Kabul must all be cleansed in order to ensure that no Tajik ever takes Kabul again.

The first edition was published in 1998 - just before the Taliban implemented the recommendation of it in 1999.

Dwayamah saqa?we by Samsur Afghan. Publisher: Jarmani? - Da Afgha?nista?n da Kaltur Wade T?olanah, 1998.


This first edition was translated into Persian by Tajiks so that more people can become aware of its existence.

 Saqa?vi?-i duvvum
by ?????? ?????. ???????: ????? ????? ? ?????: ???? ???? ???? ????. ????? ???? ???? ????. Samsu?r Afgha?n;  Khali?l Alla?h Vida?d Ba?rish


An article appeared in the foreign press about the book:

Afghan call for ethnic cleansing


United Press International
Saturday, 19 May 2001

By Derk Kinnane Roelofsma

Washington, May 18 (UPI) -- A tract calling for wholesale ethnic cleansing
in Afghanistan is circulating there and in Pakistan, according to the French
television station TF-1.

The booklet, written in Pashto, calls for the non-Pashtun Tajik and
Hazaras populations to be removed from key areas and replaced by Pashtuns
from the south of Afghanistan. The Islamist Taliban that rules most of
Afghanistan is made up of Pashtuns. Analysts consider that its extreme
beliefs are a form of Sunni Islam distorted by Pashtun tribal culture. The
book, analysts said, appears to share the Taliban view of the situation in
Afghanistan.

While they are the largest ethnic group in Afghanistan and have been
dominant in its politics for the past two centuries, it is only with the
Taliban taking power in Kabul in 1996 that the Pashtun have sought to impose
their mores on other Afghan peoples.

The book, titled "The Second Water Bearer," compares Ahmad Shah Mas'ud,
the Tajik leader of resistance to the Taliban, to Habibulla Kalakani, known
as the Waterbearer. Kalakani was a Tajik adventurer who ruled as king of
Afghanistan from January to October 1929 before being overthrown and
eventually put to death. Mas'ud is described in the book, which first
appeared in Afghanistan prior to a Taliban offensive against him in 1998, as
the second Waterbearer.

Mas'ud and his supporters in the Panjshir valley in the northeast of
Afghanistan are being aided by Russia, Iran and India. The tract says of
them, "Foreigners and those who serve them have made the Panjshir a center
of thought hostile to the other peoples of the country."

So that they are no longer manipulated by foreigners nor exploit their
geographic and military position, the Panjshir population must be cleared
out and given equivalent land in the south and west of the country, the book
says. While the Panjshir is a center of agriculture, the south is known for
its deserts, TF-1's Leonard Vincent noted on Monday.


"The national (Taliban) government has the right to move people
temporarily or permanently from one region to another if their presence is a
threat to national unity," says the book.

The tract also urges that a buffer zone be created between Kabul and the
Panjshir and Bagram, a strategically situated town to the north of the
capital. It would be settled by homeless from Pashtun areas and would
prevent Kabul being pillaged by "bandits coming from the North" -- a
reference to Mas'ud's forces.

So as to "cut off Iran's hand" in the Bamiyan area of central Afghanistan,
the Hazara population there should be removed, the book proposes, and
replaced by Sunni Muslims from Pashtun areas. Like the Iranians, the Hazara
are Shiite Muslims.

The Taliban massacred hundreds of Hazara when it occupied the town of
Yakaolang in January of this year. According to the watchdog body, Human
Rights Watch, the Taliban arrested 300 male civilians, and took them to
various assembly points where they were killed in public by firing squads.
Elderly villagers who had come to town to parlay with the Taliban were also
killed during the massacres that lasted four days.

Taliban officials subsequently denounced reports of the massacres as lies
but refused to allow United Nations observers access to the area, Vincent
reports. The analysts saw the massacres as Taliban revenge for the killing
of Pashtuns when the Hazara area was earlier occupied by forces of the
Northern Alliance. This is the resistance headed by Mas'ud that is loyal to
the deposed Burhanuddin Rabbani, who remains the internationally recognized
president of Afghanistan.

When the Taliban took the western city of Mazar-i-Sharif in 1998, they
conducted massacres against Hazara civilians there on a large scale and
killed a number of Iranian diplomats, bringing Tehran close to war with the
Pashtun government.

"The Second Waterbearer" was written by a pseudonymous Samsur Afghan,
according to TF-1. It is well known in Afghanistan and at Peshawar in
Pakistan, a center of expatriate Afghan activity. But the work appears to
have been published in Germany. The book's cover bears the emblem and name
of a Verein zur förderung der afghanischen kultur Germany" or Association
for the Advancement of Afghan Culture in Germany.

While "The Second Waterbearer" calls for banning the import of anything
contrary to the Hanafi school of Sunni Islam, the school to which the
Taliban claims to adhere, the publication comes out of a quite different
background, according to TF-1. It reflects the views of a shadowy group of
Pashtun nationalists living in Germany who derive from leftist Pashtuns
educated there going back to the 1950s. More recently these expatriates have
been involved in a German Pashtun and Baluch Committee and a Pashtun Social
Democratic Party. These were set up by members of the Afghan Communist Khalk
faction that had lived in Germany, TF-1 said, and returned there after the
collapse of the Communist government in Kabul in 1992.


--
Copyright 2001 by United Press International.





Since then a 2nd edition has been published - in 2001 - with a some changes perhaps - due to the fact that the situation on the ground changed so much in 2001.

Dwayamah saqa?we : da nawayo sandwno lah makhe lah nawayo zya?twno sarah
by Samsu?r Afgha?n. Book; Pushto. Publisher: Jarmani? - Da Afgha?nista?n da Kaltur Wade T?olanah, 2001.


So far I do not know if this second edition has been translated into Persian - or exactly how it differs from the first edition.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2008, 12:23:34 PM by Ahhangar » Logged
Ahhangar
Ahhangar
Research Team
Hero Member
*

Karma: +24/-0
Offline Offline

Posts: 655



View Profile Email
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2008, 12:40:01 PM »

Taleban moves to annihilate last opponent; [4M Edition]
David Orr in Delhi. The Times. London (UK): Jul 29, 1999. pg. 20

Abstract (Summary)

AFGHANISTAN'S ruling Taleban has begun a major military offensive against opposition forces north and northeast of the capital Kabul.

The Islamic fundamentalist regime yesterday launched assaults across four front lines ringing the heavily fortified Panjshir valley. Its aim after years of protracted civil war is to knock out once and for all its last major opponent, Ahmed Shah Masood.

Both Taleban and General Masood's Northern Alliance are claiming to have inflicted heavy casualties. A Taleban spokesman said troops had advanced four miles from Tagab, a strategic entry into the Panjshir valley, and captured the district of Nejrab.

AFGHANISTAN'S ruling Taleban has begun a major military offensive against opposition forces north and northeast of the capital Kabul.

The Islamic fundamentalist regime yesterday launched assaults across four front lines ringing the heavily fortified Panjshir valley. Its aim after years of protracted civil war is to knock out once and for all its last major opponent, Ahmed Shah Masood.

The attacks were supported by tanks, heavy artillery barrages and bombing by the militia's Russian-made MiG fighter jets. Military analysts say the size of this offensive is unprecedented.

Both Taleban and General Masood's Northern Alliance are claiming to have inflicted heavy casualties. A Taleban spokesman said troops had advanced four miles from Tagab, a strategic entry into the Panjshir valley, and captured the district of Nejrab.

He said 15 tanks and a "sizeable quantity" of ammunition had been seized. Opposition losses were conceded yesterday as heavy fighting, including artillery exchanges, raged from both sides.

Residents in Kabul said at least six rockets struck the capital, launched from surrounding hilltops by General Masood's forces. According to other reports, opposition forces fired three rockets at the capital's civilian and military airport yesterday morning. Aid flights were diverted or cancelled on Tuesday after rocket attacks near the airport.

Taleban claims to have mobilised 100,000 men for the operation but Western diplomats say 50,000 would be a more credible figure. Even this is double the previous estimate of Taleban strength in 1997.

The opposition, outnumbered by about five men to one, insists that Taleban's numbers have been bolstered by Pakistani and Arab mercenaries. Although General Masood, an ethnic Tajik, is believed to have only 10,000 to 15,000 troops, in an emergency he can probably rely on up to three times that number to defend his territory.

Taleban controls nearly 90 per cent of Afghanistan but the Government has the backing of only three countries: Pakistan, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

General Masood's forces hold the Panjshir valley and surrounding mountainous countryside to the northeast of Kabul. Foreign aid workers in the Panjshir Valley were yesterday said to be cut off from southern routes, while Kabul's eastward exit through the Khyber Pass is also understood to be impassable.

An inconclusive round of peace talks was held in Uzbekistan two weeks ago. Last week, Lakdhar Brahimi,the United Nations special envoy to Afghanistan, held talks with Taleban in an attempt to seal a meeting with General Masood. Mr Brahimi later said that arms were "pouring" into Afghanistan from neighbouring countries.
Logged
Unity
Research Team
Hero Member
*

Karma: +518/-0
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1870


View Profile Email
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2008, 01:14:40 PM »

Dear Ahangar,  Can i find this Dowyoma Saqawi book somewhere in the UK?  I really need to see what they have written in this book.
Logged
Ahhangar
Ahhangar
Research Team
Hero Member
*

Karma: +24/-0
Offline Offline

Posts: 655



View Profile Email
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2008, 01:35:26 PM »

Quote from: Rika Khana;11021
Dear Ahangar,  Can i find this Dowyoma Saqawi book somewhere in the UK?  I really need to see what they have written in this book.


The book should be available in the UK - there are many Afghan shops in London selling books. So next time you are in London - maybe Southall is the best bet - or Uxbridge - you might get lucky. Unfortunately I do not know of a specific place to recommend.

If you know anyone in Holland they could probably get hold of it quicker since the Persian translation was carried out in Holland - if I remember correctly.

Ahhangar
Logged
Gul agha
Ahura Mazda
Administrator
Sr. Member
*****

Karma: +12/-0
Offline Offline

Posts: 479



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2008, 03:02:02 PM »

Saqawi Duwum is mostly available in Kabul and a few years ago Dr. Karim Latifi, a Tajik, wrote a book in response to Saqawi duwum by the name of Yaghmieh Duwum Mangali, The second invasion of the mangals (the Taliban). There has been tons of books that have been published inside Afghanistan in the past 4 years that are on Pashtun Chauvinism. I will post the names of these books in the near future.
Logged

Ba Naam e Khudahvand e Jan o Kherad, Kazeen Bartar Andisha Bar Nagzarad
به نام خداوند جان و خرد, کزین برتر اندیشه برنگذرد
Dushanbe
P & A
Full Member
***

Karma: +113/-0
Offline Offline

Posts: 232



View Profile Email
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2008, 03:54:11 PM »

Every time we are destroyed, the sharpness of our pencils always revives us.
Logged

To Be Born Free - is Luck. To Live Free - is a Privilege. To Die Free – is a Responsibility.
Ahhangar
Ahhangar
Research Team
Hero Member
*

Karma: +24/-0
Offline Offline

Posts: 655



View Profile Email
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2008, 05:12:06 PM »

Quote from: Dushanbe;11027
Every time we are destroyed, the sharpness of our pencils always revives us.


Indeed a poetic description I have heard of the Pars (Tajik) nation is that of the Phoenix rising out of the ashes.

I think we have a long way to go before we can say we have revived ourselves.

Reviving to me means FULL SOVEREIGNTY.

The Pars (Tajik) nation needs unity to establish and protect its sovereignty.

The Pars (Tajiks) of Afghanistan lack and have lacked unity which allowed such tragedies to take place - it breaks my heart every time I think about how much we have lost due to our lack of unity and purpose.

We have the talent/manpower and resources to take over the whole of Afghanistan but we are do not realize it due to a lack of unity.

Unity is the only way.
Logged
Ahhangar
Ahhangar
Research Team
Hero Member
*

Karma: +24/-0
Offline Offline

Posts: 655



View Profile Email
« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2008, 05:37:46 PM »

Quote from: Gul agha;11024
Saqawi Duwum is mostly available in Kabul and a few years ago Dr. Karim Latifi, a Tajik, wrote a book in response to Saqawi duwum by the name of Yaghmieh Duwum Mangali, The second invasion of the mangals (the Taliban). There has been tons of books that have been published inside Afghanistan in the past 4 years that are on Pashtun Chauvinism. I will post the names of these books in the near future.


That would be great - especially the books and major articles that deal with activities aimed at Tajiks.

To what extent is the consciousness of the Tajiks within Afghanistan affected by these publications and counter publications? How widespread is knowledge of these topics amongst the Tajiks of Afghanistan?

There is a distinct need for more publicity for the topics which these books deal with.

I don't think that anyone has gone to this so called 'Center for Improvement of Afghan Culture in Germany' to see who runs it and who or which which group of individuals are responsible for this publication called 'Dowomi Saquaie'. Or do people know....?

Ahhangar
Logged
Unity
Research Team
Hero Member
*

Karma: +518/-0
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1870


View Profile Email
« Reply #9 on: July 07, 2008, 12:38:59 AM »

Quote from: Ahhangar;11028
The Pars (Tajiks) of Afghanistan lack and have lacked unity which allowed such tragedies to take place -


Dear Ahhanger, What do you think what is the reason/reasons of this diunity?
Logged
Unity
Research Team
Hero Member
*

Karma: +518/-0
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1870


View Profile Email
« Reply #10 on: July 07, 2008, 01:36:12 AM »

Quote from: Ahhangar;11023
The book should be available in the UK - there are many Afghan shops in London selling books. So next time you are in London - maybe Southall is the best bet - or Uxbridge - you might get lucky. Unfortunately I do not know of a specific place to recommend.

If you know anyone in Holland they could probably get hold of it quicker since the Persian translation was carried out in Holland - if I remember correctly.

Ahhangar


I think it is best to ask someone bring both books to from Pakistan or Afghanistan.  I am far from London and cant travel there.  


The publication of this book in Germany does not surprise me as the Afghan Milatis are really active in that coutry.
Logged
Ahhangar
Ahhangar
Research Team
Hero Member
*

Karma: +24/-0
Offline Offline

Posts: 655



View Profile Email
« Reply #11 on: July 07, 2008, 04:32:21 PM »

Quote from: Rika Khana;11039
Dear Ahhanger, What do you think what is the reason/reasons of this diunity?

Great question - one which all Pars (Tajiks) of Afghanistan ought to think about before anything else in the politics of Afghanistan.

The reasons for our disunity within Afghanistan are numerous and perhaps very complicated.

SOVEREIGNTY =   ???? , ????? ? ??????? ? ????

The loss of sovereignty - that is to say being ruled by those whom do not have our interest at heart. This is start of all the subsequent ills that develop.

Regaining sovereignty is not easy - it requires the repairing of all the destruction and remedying all the ills that a loss of sovereignty brings about. It is ultimately represented as a state. We need ensure that we govern ourselves.


Ignorance/weakening of a sense of togetherness
based on common ancestry, heritage and language. This again stems from a lack of sovereignty - when the power in our territory is in the hands of those whom do not have our interests at heart - they will seek every way to weaken us further by encouraging the ignorance and replacing the one common identity with many different clashing identities - divide and rule.

This can be remedied by actively attacking the concepts that have been propagated to our peoples to divide and use them.

A simple example is the name of our language - which is known as Farsi in Iran - Dari in Afghanistan and Tajiki in Tajikistan and Central Asia. This has to be attacked and the idea of the single name of PARSI propgated in its place. Explaining that Parsi has geographcially specific accents and that the classical written form is known as Parsi e Adabi which was in the past called Parsi e Dari (sometimes shortened to just 'Dari'). Explaining the current set up is just due to politics of those whom did not have our interests at heart.

The other thing is the names given to our people - Tajiks in one place - Fars in another - Farsiwan in another - Darizabanon in another - and the countless geographical names e.g. Panjshiri - Shamaliwal - Logari - Balkhi - Herati - and so on. This has to be remedied with the promotion of the single name of PARSI for the language and the single name of PARS for the people.  


Geographical dismemberment of our peoples by the arrival of other other settlers into our lands due to our loss of sovereignty; and by the very nature of the terrain - being mountainous - isolating people into valleys. This has led to geographically specific identities becoming stronger than a bigger pan Pars (Tajik) identity.

This can be remedied by the making the communication between the different areas where Parsians (Tajiks) are located easier - through building physical infrastructure like roads, bridged and tunnels - through telecommunications and media like telephony, internet, various broadcasting mediums, and publishing.


To sum up - we need to aim for full soveriegnty - for that we need to strengthen our sense of togetherness as one people and the importance of self government. Overcomming the many political/economic/geographical and ideological barriers that have divided our peoples should be the aim of all patriotic Parsian (Tajiks). It is our duty if we really do not want such tragedies like the Shamali to re-occur.


------------------------

 
In the Shamali people were not united - different part controlled by different political parties due to the lack of Pan Pars (Tajik) identity. Parts of the Shamali often clashed with Massoud's forces. Massoud could only really rely on Panjshiris. Between 1992-1996 when Massoud was in Kabul trying to defend it from the arious other forces - he did not have united Tajik population behind him - in Kabul the people wanted to be just neutral  and in Shamali some were working with Massoud's enemies - and so after all the fighting to defeat the foreign sponsored opposition factions - be it Uzbek Dostom Pashtun Gulbudin/Tanai or Hazara Ali Mazari - with the rise of the Taliban - he did not feel secure enough to think that the Taliban would cut his way in the north and so he chose to retreat from Kabul. The Tajiks of Herat simply refused to cooperate with Massouds forces. During the retreat his forces were looted by various groups in the Shamali.  Then the Taliban took Kabul and took their time to get ready to implement the recommendations of the Dowomi Saqaui book in Shamali - but the people of Shamali being totally unaware and ignorant of what was to come. This is all die to a lack of common consciousness across the Pars (Tajik) population of Afghanistan.

IF there was a common front of all the Tajiks of Afghanistan - then our people would not need to make precarious alliances with treacherous Hazara Uzbek and various Pashtun groups - which has cost us so much. There was a time when Uzbek Dostum was fighting Massoud in the north east and Ismail Khan in the north west - in alliance with the Taliban as well as Hazara Ali Mazari fighting Massoud in the west of Kabul in alliace with the Taliban. If the Tajiks of Ismail Khan were ready to help with Massoud in Kabul - he would have not needed to ally with Dostum. Their disunity ed to both of them losing their territory with tragic consequences for the Tajik civilians. If they were united they would have both survived.

Ahhangar
Logged
Super
Administrator
Sr. Member
*****

Karma: +29/-0
Offline Offline

Posts: 261



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #12 on: July 13, 2008, 05:28:38 AM »

Dear Ahanager,

I do agree with the points you mentioned above. Our unity is indeed the key to our success.
To the best of my knowledge, disunity among Tajiks in Afghanistan has been at its peak, and most of our prominant figures haven't done a damn thing to improve it; all they have cared for is their economical and personal benefits- not at national level.

After gaining the power in Kabul in 1992, they didn't establish a basis for themselves in the government: most of them lacked administrative skills, and those Tajiks who were literate but had worked in previous government, hardly got the chance to do something, while they were the ones who played an important role in transfering the power to them. They got labelled as communists, and so on.

By the time that the period of Mujadidi was ending, Massoud emphasised on having Rabbani as the president, since he believed that he could do better. But unfortuntely, after two years Rabbani failed as well, and Massoud asked Rabbani to give up, but Rabbani didn't agree. This matter created a big problem between Massoud and Rabbani and their followers.

The fact was that Rabbani was surrounded by a group of people who were reluctant to lose their positions in the government and they did everything to set Rabbani against Massoud, just for their personal reasons, not knowing that it was Massoud who fought and had control over Kabul.

These internal problems, were one of the reasons that, made Massoud leave Kabul and establish his base back in Panjshir, which resulted the creation of resistence force in north. Since the rest gave up the war against Taliban, Massoud emphasized on keep on fighting, and that gave him the chance to lead the war, and the rest to follow him. Still there were a lot of disunity among the force.

Later on, after the loss of Massoud in the suicide attack, they found out how crucial the existence of Massoud was for them and for the nation, they began to praise him by writing poems, and making loud speeches.

I think that Massoud was a very important figure among Tajiks who could really do a lot for us, unless he didn't face that much internal resistence from the Tajiks themselves.
Tajiks of Afghanistan are more in favour of worshiping Pashtun lords, than their own Tajiks. That is one of the reasons of our failure. I know some of guys who are calling themselves Khurasanis and so on, but they have no sincere respect to Massoud's sacrifice, which is really a pity.

Superior
Logged

Nietzche: God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him. How shall we comfort ourselves, the murderers of all murderers? Is not the greatness of this deed too great for us? Must we ourselves not become gods simply to appear worthy of it?
Ahhangar
Ahhangar
Research Team
Hero Member
*

Karma: +24/-0
Offline Offline

Posts: 655



View Profile Email
« Reply #13 on: July 13, 2008, 08:08:21 PM »

Quote from: Superior;11443
Dear Ahanager,

I do agree with the points you mentioned above. Our unity is indeed the key to our success.
To the best of my knowledge, disunity among Tajiks in Afghanistan has been at its peak, and most of our prominant figures haven't done a damn thing to improve it; all they have cared for is their economical and personal benefits- not at national level.

After gaining the power in Kabul in 1992, they didn't establish a basis for themselves in the government: most of them lacked administrational skills, and those Tajiks who were literate but had worked in previous government, hardly got the chance to do something, while they were the ones who played an important role in transfering the power to them. They got labelled as communists, and so on.

By the time that the period of Mujadidi was ending, Massoud emphasised on having Rabbani as the president, since he believed that he could do better. But unfortuntely, after two years Rabbani failed as well, and Massoud asked Rabbani to give up, but Rabbani didn't agree. This matter created a big problem between Massoud and Rabbani and their followers.

The fact was that Rabbani was surrounded by a group of people who were reluctant to lose their positions in the government and they did everything to set Rabbani against Massoud, just for their personal reasons, not knowing that it was Massoud who fought and had control over Kabul.

These internal problems, were one of the reasons that, made Massoud leave Kabul and establish his base back in Panjshir, which resulted the creation of resistence force in north. Since the rest gave up the war against Taliban, Massoud emphasized on keep on fighting, and that gave him the chance to lead the war, and the rest to follow him. Still there were a lot of disunity among the force.

Later on, after the loss of Massoud in the suicide attack, they found out how crucial the existence of Massoud was for them and for the nation, they began to praise him by writing poems, and making loud speeches.

I think that Massoud was a very important figure among Tajiks who could really do a lot for us, unless he didn't face that much internal resistence from the Tajiks themselves.
Tajiks of Afghanistan are more in favour of worshiping Pashtun lords, than their own Tajiks. That is one of the reasons of our failure. I know some of guys who are calling themselves Khurasanis and so on, but they have no sincere respect to Massoud's sacrifice, which is really a pity.

Superior


Dear Superior,

Thank you for the informative post. We need to investigate our failures throughly without hesitation or fear.  It is only through knowing what caused our failures that we can change the status quo.

We need to think about what will bring about our unity.  It is the biggest challenge we face - and the one that will most determine the future of our people.
Logged
Parsistani
Hero Member
*****

Karma: +216/-0
Offline Offline

Posts: 744


View Profile Email
« Reply #14 on: July 19, 2008, 03:00:31 PM »

When i ask you shall we study clausewitz´s principles of war and making war on these bastards....someone of you call me an idiot...but now i ask you again...shall we will or get killed? Btw, spread such informations so far you can!! Every Tajik should read it and every should kill an Ahrimanian Kuchi dog
Logged

Pages: [1] 2 3
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

 
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP bluBlur Skin 2006, hbSkins
Powered by SMF 2.0 RC1 | SMF © 2006–2009, Simple Machines LLC
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!