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Author Topic: Tajiki literature online?  (Read 4034 times)
David Thornton
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« on: December 10, 2008, 07:28:55 AM »

Hi. Are there any website which contain any texts, esp novels, in Tajiki? I would like a chance to read some continuous (and not too difficult) Tajiki prose. Thanks.
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Khurasani
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« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2008, 08:24:54 AM »

It is really good to see you wondering about Tajiks. I read your post about Tajiki novels; i think you must search as "Persian novels" or "Farsi novels" because these are all same from root.

Also i offer you "khalid hosseini"; you can read about him here : http://www.khaledhosseini.com

I also PM you.

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David Thornton
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« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2008, 01:52:01 AM »

Thanks, Khurasani. As I said in my reply to your message, I am interested in novels or stories written by authors from Tajikistan or Uzbekistan. In particular, I want to examine the differences between Tajik Persian and Farsi/Iranian Persian. I have read some grammar books, which show that Tajiki has some Turkic/Uzbek syntactical features and other differences, but I'd like to see these features used "in practice", andnot just in grammars. Does this make sense?
David
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Dushanbe
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« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2008, 02:12:19 PM »

Hi David, I am Tajik from Tajikistan but now studying abroad. Actually, I do not know if you can find Tajik novels/stories on-line, but you can find a lot of Tajik websites in Cyrillic - news, history books.

 
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Khurasanzad
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« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2008, 03:42:02 AM »

Thanks, Khurasani. As I said in my reply to your message, I am interested in novels or stories written by authors from Tajikistan or Uzbekistan. In particular, I want to examine the differences between Tajik Persian and Farsi/Iranian Persian. I have read some grammar books, which show that Tajiki has some Turkic/Uzbek syntactical features and other differences, but I'd like to see these features used "in practice", andnot just in grammars. Does this make sense?
David

Actually, the Turkic languages have adoptet a lot of Choresmian and Sogdian syntactical features, most of all from Sogdians. Turks and Iranians lived side by side upper of Choresmia and Sogdia (northward of old-Afrasiab). Nearly all Turkic language have Sogdian influence, except the Chinese Turks, whose language are clean of Iranian influence, so different from other Turkic languages of Central Asia and Europe.
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David Thornton
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« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2008, 05:02:10 AM »

That's very interesting. I know little about Sogdian. However, most of the material by linguists I've read state that many of the features of Central Asian Tajik, esp the northern dialects, not found in Iranian Persian, are borrowings and syntactical calques on Uzbek (which, in some cases, might in turn be taken from Sogdian, but no one I've read discusses this): the use of the past participle ending -agi to form a kind of relative clause is very Turkic, for example. In the latter case, I have mostly found examples of such constructions in sections of grammar books illustrating that feature, and rarely elsewhere. I wonder how widespread such usage is.
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Dushanbe
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« Reply #6 on: December 21, 2008, 06:21:10 AM »

It is really interesting. The present Tajik language grammar was founded on the basis of Samarqandi dialect (which is now located in Uzbekistan). And yes, there are some influece of Turkic words in the North of Tajikistan. If you look at the map of the region and the location of North of Tajikistan province, you will understand why - it is almost isolated by Turkic speaking countries - it is divided from the rest of Tajikistan by high mountains.

And could you please post some words with Turkic particles?



 
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