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Author Topic: My Respectful Critique of the Khorasanni Movement  (Read 31448 times)
Parsistani
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« Reply #45 on: May 30, 2009, 03:26:03 AM »

Khurasanzad,

good points you have above mentioned. I would recommend some movies like ''The Charge of the Light Brigade'' or ''The betrayal of Surat Khan'' (a continuation of the first one). Both movies are explaining the political situation of India and Pakistan/Afghanistan. Furthermore, they show how the native population of Pakistan and NWFP are cooperating with the british crown and how their minds are working, specially that of the Pashtuns. They also show how Pashtun tribesmen are kidnapping and killing female members and children of the british and Indo-British corps and how their children get terrorized and massacred. Even babies are their victims. Noone should be suprised of Pashtuns. They are still the same people as they were yesterday, see on Taliban and the rest of their groups.#

Have a look on this http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/taliban/tribal/churchill.html

Churchill: "Stone Age savages whose daily deeds are treachery and violence."

Compare now by yourself modern Pashtuns and those who lived 100 years ago
« Last Edit: May 30, 2009, 07:10:09 AM by Parsistani » Logged

Parsistani
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« Reply #46 on: May 31, 2009, 12:51:10 PM »

good point.
I noticed that too in Afghanistan - there was nothing but love between its people. sadly, in the west, facsists have been lurking around the internet in particularly, posting vicious lies that create more hatred and division between all people in afghanistan as well as it's diasporic population.


hahaha at Punjabis. I think that title is reserved for Indian-loving Kabulis

Yeah ... I guess that why Afghanistan was such a paradise before 2009, right?! ::)

http://www.sarnavesht.com/main/index.php/weblog/extended/1492/
http://www.sarnavesht.com/main/index.php/weblog/extended/1393/
« Last Edit: May 31, 2009, 02:43:50 PM by Parsistani » Logged

Lindt
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« Reply #47 on: June 01, 2009, 02:44:17 AM »

Have you even been to Afghanistan in recent years? if not, you are in no position to speak  ::)


And why have ProudAfghan's posts been deleted when Khurasanzad's filth has continued to stain this forum? i'm disappointed in the biased stance of the admin.
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Parsistani
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« Reply #48 on: June 01, 2009, 03:22:17 AM »

It seems that you are unrelated with Afghanistan. In Kabul, a Non-Tajik would not even turn his face to a Pashtoon or enter a Pashtoon shop. Stop propagating your BS. Every Non-Tajik know who Pashtoons are and why they are in Kabul, Mazar, Herat act.

Quote
Ethnic tension, insecurity casts doubt on Afghan vote

KABUL (Reuters) - The legitimacy of Afghan elections this year could be jeopardized if dominant ethnic Pashtuns fail to vote due to poor security and disenchantment with President Hamid Karzai, raising the prospect of even worse violence.

Fighting is already at its heaviest since U.S.-led forces toppled the Taliban in 2001, but almost all battles are in the south and east; areas populated by Pashtuns, many of them angry at their perceived exclusion from power and alleged abuses by foreign troops.

If Pashtuns feel more disenfranchised after the polls due in September, the impoverished and traumatized country could be polarized further still and violence could reach new peaks.

"Pashtuns are less likely to participate in elections because of bad security and yet they represent the largest part of the Afghan population," said Wahid Mojdah, a political analyst and expert on the Taliban.

"For 150 years the Pashtuns have been in government in Afghanistan, in every phase that Pashtuns have been out of power there has been war in Afghanistan," he said.

Recognizing that Pashtun participation is key to ensuring success in the presidential election, the United States is to deploy most of its planned 20,000 to 30,000 extra troops to secure the south.

"With the introduction of two additional brigades, the regional commander in the south should have sufficient manpower to ensure successful elections," said one U.S. defense official at the Pentagon, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

Karzai, a Pashtun from the southern province of Kandahar, the birthplace of the Taliban, has lost a good deal of public support due to his failure to improve security and clean up endemic official corruption since he was elected in 2004.

"There's a clear sense that people haven't been given what they were promised. It was implied there would be stability and democracy and I don't think that has happened at all," said an international analyst in Afghanistan, who declined to be named.

Many Pashtuns also feel Karzai has given too much power to northerners who helped U.S. troops oust the Taliban.

NORTH AND SOUTH

In a country where even voting for the Afghan equivalent of Pop Idol was clearly split along ethnic lines, the next presidential election is likely to be similar to the last when results closely mirrored the country's ethnic divisions.

The first hurdle is the registration of voters which begins in the southern Pashtun heartlands in eight days time.

A senior electoral official said if security did not improve in the south, voter registration would be low.

In Ghazni province, southwest of Kabul, the Taliban have made great inroads in the last two years, but it is still more secure than the volatile southern provinces of Kandahar and Helmand.

Even so, election officials were not able to reach large parts of heavily populated, but remote Pashtun districts of Ghazni because of the strength of the Taliban there, Habib Rahman, head of the provincial council, told Reuters.

By contrast, voter registration in the mainly ethnic Tajik, Hazara and Uzbek provinces of the north has already been completed without major incident.

"It's completely different from the south, we could provide security for the voters even with just one or two policemen, but you cannot do the same in the south," said Mohammad Omar Sulaimani, governor of Kunduz province in the north.

A possible rival Pashtun candidate to Karzai could also split the vote in the south and east and, were it not for the deep divisions among the minority groups, could lead to an upset.

"An Uzbek, a Hazara or Tajik winning would destabilize the country," Mojdah said. "It's unlikely this would happen, but if it does it will lead to many problems in Afghanistan ... the Taliban do not want a U.S.-style democracy here."

Low voter registration in the south might not necessarily mean a low turnout in the election as those who still have voting cards from the 2004 poll can use them instead and officials admit it is impossible to know how many have kept their old cards.

Tight security then only needs to be imposed on election day itself, diplomats say.

If close to 100,000 foreign troops and some 140,000 Afghan security forces cannot secure the country for "just one goddarn day," a senior Western diplomat said, then "what the hell are we doing here?"

http://www.reuters.com/article/newsOne/idUSTRE50B3P320090112?pageNumber=2&vi rtualBrandChannel=0

I also have another one for you

Quote
Afghan recovery report: Land dispute sparks ethnic tension

Source: Institute for War and Peace Reporting (IWPR)

Date: 09 Oct 2008

Pashtun refugees returning to claim homes and lands in Takhar face opposition from local Uzbeks.

By Gulrahim Niyazman and Sayed Yaqub Ibrahimi in Takhar (ARR No. 302, 9-Oct-08)

Life is becoming increasingly perilous for 82 families who have spent the past six weeks languishing in an old prison in Takhar province. Denied food and clean drinking water, and living in the open without adequate shelter, they are becoming desperate.

"The soldiers bring things from the local bazaar, and sell them to us for four times the normal price," said Shahwo, a 45-year-old woman who has been virtually imprisoned for more than one month. "If you ask them for change, they just say 'shut up or I'll smash you in the mouth'."

In late August, Shahwo and more than 500 former residents of Takhar province returned following years of exile in Pakistan.

Most are Pashtuns, the majority ethnic group in Afghanistan, who had fled the fighting that plagued their province during the Soviet invasion. Now, after more than two decades, they have come back to reclaim their houses and lands.

But local residents, drawn mainly from the Uzbek minority, have long since moved into the abandoned properties.

To prevent an outbreak of hostilities, say the authorities, they brought the Pashtuns to an old prison in the Khajabahauddin district of Takhar. Originally built by jihadi commander Ahmad Shah Massoud in the mid-1990s to jail Taleban fighters, it has turned into an uncomfortable refuge for the returnees.

"My children are ill, they have fever, diarrhea, vomiting," complained Shahwo. "I cannot take them anywhere for treatment. Yesterday one of my neighbour's children died, and we could not even have a normal funeral service. Armed men accompanied us to the cemetery."

The troubles started several weeks ago, when the 82 Pashtun families, numbering 575 persons, arrived in Lalah Gozar, a village in Khajabahuddin district. They possessed documents that they claim proved their right to lands and houses that they had occupied before they were driven out by war. Since 1985, the families had been living across the Pakistan border, in Balochistan. Now they wanted to come home.

But the Uzbek residents of Lalah Gozar were not eager to see the truck caravans containing the worldly possessions of the Pashtun families. They blocked roads and staged protests to keep the returnees from unloading their belongings.

"Why should I give my 102 jeribs to these people?" said Qari Hamidullah, an Uzbek resident of Lalah Gozar.

The lands in question have a long and troubled history. According to Hajji Jamshed, an Uzbek elder in Lalah Gozar, the territory was originally held by Uzbeks.

"We have 80-year-old documents saying that this area was under the control of our fathers, who worked the land," he told IWPR. "Fifty-two years ago, the government came and took these lands from us and gave them to the Pashtuns. Then they came and started to work on these lands. But we will not let these murderers, these al-Qaeda terrorists back, not at any price."

Many Afghans blame the Pashtun majority for the excesses of the Taleban regime. Taleban were drawn largely from the Pashtuns, and they imposed a strict interpretation of Islam on an often unwilling population.

"We are not related to any …. group," said Abdul Jabar, one of the returnees. "We were just victims of fighting. But just by being part of an ethnic group we are [under suspicion]."

Given the level of local antagonism, it seems the government had little choice but to put the Pashtuns in the old prison, said Hajji Akram Anwari, governor of Khajabahuddin district.

"The Pashtun returnees have legal documents," he told IWPR. "But if they went right to their homes they would have been attacked by the Uzbek militias.

"These returnees are not prisoners. But where they are now is the safest place for them."

His fears seem to be well-founded.

"We were waiting in ambush for those returnees," said Hajji Jamshed. "If the governor had not stopped them and taken them to the prison, we would have attacked them and killed them."

The returning Pashtuns say that the land, given to them by the government over 50 years ago, was just a swamp before their fathers and grandfathers cleared it and made it usable. According to the law in force at the time, non-arable land distributed by the government became the property of those working it after 30 years.

"We were given the lands by the government in 1957," said Abdul Jabar, one of the returnees. "We should have received title deeds in 1987, but we had to leave in 1985, because of the fighting. Was this our fault?"

Uzbeks living on the land abandoned by the Pashtuns are confused as to who actually owns it.

"I have been living in this district for 15 years," said Khal Mohammad. "I came here during the civil war, built a house in Mahajer Kishlaq and started to live here. I do not know whether somebody has documents for this land. I do not."

Another Uzbek resident, who did not want to be named, told IWPR that, for him, the issue was clear. "These lands belong to those families who have returned from Pakistan," he said.

His understanding is that the lands were given away during the chaotic civil war years of the mid-1990s.

"The land was distributed to other people by Mohammad Kabir Marzban, who was governor of Takhar at that time," he said. "But in my opinion the returnees have the right to the land and it should be returned to them."

Faiz Mohammad Tawheddi, spokesperson for the provincial governor, said that had the Pashtun returnees informed the government in advance of their decision to come back, better accommodation might have been found.

But the returnees are not asking for government shelter; they want their houses and lands.

"I lived here, and left my home because of the Soviets," said Shahwo. "I do not see the need to ask permission from the government to come back. These people stole my home, and the government should kick them out."

The government has been slow to act. The issue is a delicate one, because of long-simmering ethnic tensions in the country. The president has sent a delegation to investigate, but the issues are too complicated to be easily resolved.

"After talking to both sides, we asked that we be given one month to find a solution," said Wahidullah Sabawoon, who headed the presidential delegation. "We had two suggestions for the president, either to send the whole issue to the courts, or to return the lands to the refugees by decree. He is studying the question."

Abdul Jabar Sholgarai, a parliamentarian from Ghazni province, who was also a member of the delegation, said, "We were unable to solve the problem. There are political hands behind this. They are provoking the Uzbeks against the Pashtuns in order to gain control of the region."

He would not specify exactly who could be responsible.

The delegation is making a second attempt to resolve the issue, but tempers are running high.

Doctor Zalmai, head of the complaints commission of the Mashrano Jirga, parliament's upper house, told IWPR that the fires of protest were being fanned by some politicians.

"Kabir Marzban and Engineer Raz Mohammad are behind this issue and are supporting a specific ethnic faction. Unless they are both arrested, there will never be a solution to Khajabahuddin," said Doctor Zalmai, who like many Afghans only uses one name.

But Kabir Marzban, formerly governor of Takhar and now a senator, denied that he was involved.

"The return of these people has nothing to do with me," he told IWPR. "It's the responsibility of the government to give them back their homes."

Engineer Raz Mohammad, a representative for Takhar in parliament's lower house, could not be reached for comment.

Some members of the government are trying to depoliticise the issue, hoping that a more pragmatic approach will yield results.

Sher Mohammad Etibari, Afghanistan's minister for refugees and repatriation, was summoned to parliament to give information about the crisis.

"These people (the Pashtuns) were residents of that area," he testified. "Even the Uzbek elders confirm this. They say that the treatment of these returnees is cruel. (Some people) are taking advantage of the government's weakness."

Etibari said the government should judge the situation on its legal merits, "If the government uses its authority in the area and acts according to the documents … the issue will be solved in a day. But if the issue becomes politicised, it will take months."

For now the Pashtun families are living in very difficult conditions.

"We have 29 families living in one of the prison yards, with just three rooms," said Abdul Zahir, 30, who was sitting in the shade of one of the prison walls. "Another 35 families are living in another yard, with just four rooms. The remaining 18 families are living in the main prison block, where the rooms are two metres long and one metre wide. Each family has one room."

The prison is guarded by groups of police, who are meant to keep the families safe. But those inside feel more like inmates than guests. They have little food, the water is foul, and many subsist on wild greens that they cut and boil.

"Some of our people have become ill and have died, because we cannot get them medicine," said Abdul Hakim, head of a family of ten. "Our children cannot go outside. Local warlords are beating people who try to help us, and they have told the local bakeries not to sell us bread. Even the Russians were not this cruel. And these people call themselves Muslims and jihadis?"

Sayed Iqbal, head of the provincial refugee department, told IWPR that his office could do little for the returnees.

"The refugee department in Takhar is just symbolic," he said. "I am the head of the office and I receive 3,000 afghani per month (approximately 60 US dollars). If I have official guests I have to pay for their tea and cookies out of my own pocket. So how am I supposed to help these returnees?"

Engineer Manan, a representative of the returnees, went to Kabul to talk to the government. But he, too, was unable to make any progress. "Unfortunately the government is doing nothing," he told IWPR.

With the beginning of the election campaign, the government of Hamed Karzai, who is himself Pashtun, has not wanted to side too openly with the Pashtuns in the north, said Manan.

"These lands are ours, and everybody knows that these lands are ours," he said. "We have valid documents. But the government is silent. It is trying to conduct an election campaign, to get the votes of the local people, and show that the government is not on the side of the Pashtuns. Instead, it is on the side of some local warlords."

With the approach of winter, he said conditions for the returnees could deteriorate, "But even if we die under the rain and snow, or perish from hunger, we will not leave our lands."

http://www.reliefweb.int/rw/rwb.nsf/db900sid/EVOD-7K9GZB?OpenDocument&query= documents%20on%20Afghanistan

Sooner or later, Americans will expand their attacks on Taliban and the Pashtoons also to north and west of Afghanistan. At the moment, it´s the turn of the south and east, up to NWFP. And sooner, Tajiks will also kick Pashtoons out the sh*it of them in Kabul, Herat, Farah etc. and send them back where they came from. The immigrants who came illigal back to north and central to support their Pashtoon brothers against the Non-Pashtoon people and civilization and in turn Pashtunize the country there will do not work more and everyone is aware of that fact. Noone want Pashtoons, neither Tajiks, Iranians, Punjabis, Sindhis, Tarkhanis, Aababzis, Baluchis, Europeans etc., just noone. Khurasanzad´s comments were possibly not deleted because of their truths in them that make some uneducated persons hard to believe it. I have read the BS what Taliban4Ever have created and it had a deletion value. Btw, he was swearing.

Pashtoon populated regions and Pashtoon world




Non-Pashtoon populated regions and Non-Pashtoon culture











I say it again. It´s like ''Iran vs. Turan'', ''Brightness vs. Darkness'', ''Civilization vs. Washigari''.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2009, 03:54:49 AM by Parsistani » Logged

Lindt
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« Reply #49 on: June 01, 2009, 04:55:15 AM »

parsistani,

there is a different with relying on what is written because you do not know whether the author is being biased, or what exactly their intentions are. it is another thing to actually go to afghanistan and realise that although ethnic tensions continue to persist, it really is not destructive amongst everyday people whether they are rural or urban dwellers.

your comment about entering shops owned by a certain ethnic group... ya, im sure that's a lie. i have been to afghanistan and it seems like you have not.
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Parsistani
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« Reply #50 on: June 01, 2009, 05:14:08 AM »

parsistani,

there is a different with relying on what is written because you do not know whether the author is being biased, or what exactly their intentions are. it is another thing to actually go to afghanistan and realise that although ethnic tensions continue to persist, it really is not destructive amongst everyday people whether they are rural or urban dwellers.

your comment about entering shops owned by a certain ethnic group... ya, im sure that's a lie. i have been to afghanistan and it seems like you have not.

 ::) ::)

sitting in the West and enjoying asylm and welfare than talking without any idea what is going on in Afghanistan does not make you to a trusty person. I was for a short time as a communicater and translater in September and Dezember 2008 in Kabul and Faizabad. In the coming December I will possibly go again to Faizabad and Kunduz for 8 month. I know how it looks there and I also know the ethnic rivalry between Pashtoons and Tajiks. Not a single Non-Pashtoon will ever enter the field of a Pashtoon because they fear that they get kidnapped or killed by a suicide bomber. Living side to side with a Pashtoons meaning accepting attacks. Modern medias like Youtube are the best examples for the ethnic differences between Pashtoon terrorists and the Guardians of Khurasan and represent very well the situation in Afghanistan. You just disregarding this fact for your sick illusions and wet dreams. If you want to be a trustful man than don´t act like a liar here. There is nothing that has the value to hide it from reality. Those who have a brain and the intellect will be able to see the reality than this feignes picture you want to potray. Every educated person will make his own picture about Afghanistan and it´s ethnic rivalry, specially in Kabul where Pashtoons have no good situations. In Afghanistan, many facts are not out-spoken and are banned by the government and one of them is the screaming of Pashtoons. Kabul is a Tajik city, Tajik ruled city and only Tjaik laws have to be there.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2009, 05:21:22 AM by Parsistani » Logged

Khurasanzad
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« Reply #51 on: June 05, 2009, 02:05:43 PM »

www.sp.unipi.it/files/2848-disintegration-as-hope-05-2006-09-11-afghanistan.pdf

Disintigration as a Hope - by Mauro Vaiani, scholar of University of Pisa

Read also http://www.mainstreamweekly.net/article1375.html
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Amir al Ghaznavi
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« Reply #52 on: June 07, 2009, 02:02:47 PM »

ohhhhhhhhhhh khorasanzad bachem,

ive been asking you all week about this family of yours in toronto that you were trying to threaten me with

lol

until you realized that i aint no joke

so cmon big man, you talk real big about pashtuns on line like a coward

i am here in toronto, show me your family and friends. i am willing to video tape and upload on to tajikam.com

cmon buddy

you brought up my family first to disrespect them, then you brought up that you know im from toronto and you have family here as if to threaten me

cmon baby
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Khurasani
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« Reply #53 on: June 08, 2009, 12:14:37 AM »

Amir al Ghaznavi i am really sorry because of you. This is your Ghayrat. You cant bring any logical reason and you ask Khurasanzad for his address and family..

Pity for you..
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Amir al Ghaznavi
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« Reply #54 on: June 08, 2009, 11:40:18 AM »

Khurasani

I am sorry you lack logical reasoning and deduction capabilities

your bias and lack of common sense is exposed

Everyone of you on this site have accepted Khurasanzads daily attacks and insults on Pashtuns, that go beyond any reasonable academic critique, and than you have the nerve to criticize me you munafiq?

Khurasanzad insults Pashtuns online, so I told him, not to be a coward, and that if he wanted to insuilt pashtuns he should be willing to do so to Pashtuns to their face. I then asked him why wouldnt he identify who he is, so that Pashtuns can address him personally

He then mentioned that he KNEW i lived in toronto, and that he had family here.

So you Munafiq, dont criticize me. Criticize your coward friend here, who brought up my location first, and brought up his family first, and made threats and insults first

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Khurasani
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« Reply #55 on: June 08, 2009, 02:39:39 PM »

Amir al Ghaznavi the Amiril Mominin thanks for the word Munafiq.

Topic Closed.
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