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Panjabis and Sindhis push Pashtuns out of Peshawar Rate Topic: -----

#41 User is offline   Nader Shah Icon

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Posted 22 December 2010 - 11:18 PM

It seems you misunderstood me. What I meant is that Sohrab may have come to accept Nationalist Pakistani positions after being exposed to it every day. But he explained that it is the opposite that is happening.

View PostParsistani, on 17 December 2010 - 01:06 PM, said:

Dear Nader Shah,

you sound a bit naiv. Hey, what would you say if Arabs or Turks would take over Tabriz or Tehran when they would start to immigrate to Iran? Would you accept that?

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#42 User is offline   bukhari Icon

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Posted 23 December 2010 - 04:01 AM

View PostSohrab, on 19 December 2010 - 08:14 AM, said:

pakistan, their leaders, media and public have very strange understanding of Afghanistan. they think everything about afghanistan is nothing but pashtoon, the issue of NWFP is also sensitive to them, but their policy makers intentially forget and their publc dont know that it was pashtons of afghanistan that wanted to break pakistan. Their support of pashtons are out of fear, they simply dont want to upset pashtoons in afghanistan and also they want to show to the pashtons of pakistan that pakistan is always to the side of pashtons. the second gain of this policy is to keep Afghanistan to its lowest level by dividing it on ethnic line basis, but they forget that afghanistan is already divided by past pashtoon policy makers in Afghanistan. Above all this, they need to know or at least stop pretend not knowing that non pashtoons of AFghanistan are the only people who want teritorial integrrity of Pakistan unlike pashtoons of afghanistan that want to break pakistan.


Salaam Sohrab, it's a good initiative you'd taken. As a Pakistani i feel there's a lot more we can learn about each other, in turn getting rid of the misunderstandings (and subsequent 'hate'). I'll do my part here. I know we can all agree on the fact that the region is extremely complex, and that running down 'the other' as the devil is not only counterproductive towards building an understanding but wholly in the face of facts.
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#43 User is offline   Sohrab Icon

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 02:25 PM

View Postbukhari, on 23 December 2010 - 04:01 AM, said:

Salaam Sohrab, it's a good initiative you'd taken. As a Pakistani i feel there's a lot more we can learn about each other, in turn getting rid of the misunderstandings (and subsequent 'hate'). I'll do my part here. I know we can all agree on the fact that the region is extremely complex, and that running down 'the other' as the devil is not only counterproductive towards building an understanding but wholly in the face of facts.


hello dear bukhari, wellcome to the forum and please make more contributions here.
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#44 User is offline   Parsistani Icon

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 02:55 PM

View Postbukhari, on 23 December 2010 - 04:01 AM, said:

Salaam Sohrab, it's a good initiative you'd taken. As a Pakistani i feel there's a lot more we can learn about each other, in turn getting rid of the misunderstandings (and subsequent 'hate'). I'll do my part here. I know we can all agree on the fact that the region is extremely complex, and that running down 'the other' as the devil is not only counterproductive towards building an understanding but wholly in the face of facts.


Welcome,

can you please tell us how Bukharians in Pakistan feel themself? Do they understand themself as ''Bukharians'' or as the local ethnicities? I know many ''Beys'' and ''Bukharis'' are powerful man.
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#45 User is offline   Kakar Icon

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 07:29 PM

View PostParsistani, on 13 December 2010 - 11:53 AM, said:

Karachi is in the hands of Sindhis and Panjabis. The Pashtuns are known as ''mohajers'' there and have no influence. The Pashtun population (ca. 4mio.) are immigrants from NWFP and federal tribal areas as well from south Waziristan. Right now, there is an ethnical and political war in Karachi where Psahtuns seems to be the victims. No matter what PigTun nationalists claim (''from Amu to Abaseen'' LOL) they will never be able to take over Karachi. The Punjabis and Sindhis self don´t let such a step. One reason is that Karachi´s population makes 20 mio. and the majority (more than 50%) are native Urdu-speaker. But it is interesting that some ''Kabulkhel'' and Bukhari Tajiks play very important roles in the economy and policy of the region. F.ex. Sirat Kabulkhel, a regional politician with strong anti-Pashtun feelings is leading a nationalist movement against Pashtuns and it seems that the PPP party is strongly allied with him and his nationalist views. I also say death to Pashtun niggers.

Gabari self is a filthy Paki Pashtun from Swat. He is not even a member of the Iranic people. Like him, many people today are in identity crises and look for a nother identity, like the Jats who claim beeing from Khorasan or the Kakhars and others.

I´ve just found this article. It´s about Pashtuns http://news.bbc.co.u...sia/7884222.stm and it give me right.



1. The Pashtuns are not known as Muhajirs. The Indians from North India are the Muhajirs

2. Pashtuns make up a significant minority but have been denied democratic rights and representation. Their demand and insistence upon greater rights is a threat to the MQM Mafia in Karachi who have began targeting them, but the Pakhtana are going bullet for bullet, body for body with them. And they are outnumber 2 to 1.

3. With all due respect, I have noticed many Khorasan/Persian nationalists who talk about race and ethnicity all day have mongoloid features. I exposed one individual like this on youtube. At the end of the day, its all irrelevant, but if you wanna speak on iranic vs turkic vs mongoloid vs indic features, put your picture up, and lets see if you look like Zoraster lol
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#46 User is offline   Parsistani Icon

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 08:03 PM

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1. The Pashtuns are not known as Muhajirs. The Indians from North India are the Muhajirs


Pashtuns are the New ''Muhajers''. Those native ''Mohajers'' are in fact part of Sindh through language, history, location and their great civilisation. I know that the old term ''Muhajer'' is today used in an ethnic sense for Urdu-speaking people but the Pashtuns are threatend like aliens there and thus are Muhajers (Immigrants) which is legitimated.

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2. Pashtuns make up a significant minority but have been denied democratic rights and representation. Their demand and insistence upon greater rights is a threat to the MQM Mafia in Karachi who have began targeting them, but the Pakhtana are going bullet for bullet, body for body with them. And they are outnumber 2 to 1.


That´s their right. Pashtuns live in their lands and have to accept their civil rules of law and identity. It´s not the other way round as Taliban, Haqqani and other Pashtun terror groups try to propagate and call Karachi as part of ''Pashtun land''. Pashtuns want to own Karachi but Karachi does not belong them as today Peshawar does. You talk about democracy but where is democracy and rights for all non-Pashtuns through to globe, be it India, Afghanistan, NFWP or wherever. Where was the rights of the original Swat and Peshawar owners and it´s population when Pashtun thugs of the Yusufzais and Khattak half-Mughal inbreeds invaded Swat and Peshawar and took all their lands and gave it to Pashtun nomadic immigrants or where were the rights of ''minorities'' in Afghanistan the last two centurieS OR the rights of the by force replaced Pashais and many other people that once lived in regions as independant people that are today occupied by Pashtun thugs, specially from Turko-Mongol Ghalzai branch? Where are the rights of Shia Hazaras, Kashmiris, Swatis and many more people in Pakistan who are forced, becausee of the location of their roots next to barbarian Pashtuns like their Taliban, Haqqani, Lashkar-e Taiba and Al-Qaida children, to stay there?

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3. With all due respect, I have noticed many Khorasan/Persian nationalists who talk about race and ethnicity all day have mongoloid features. I exposed one individual like this on youtube. At the end of the day, its all irrelevant, but if you wanna speak on iranic vs turkic vs mongoloid vs indic features, put your picture up, and lets see if you look like Zoraster lol


What was that for a comment and what has Iranic and Mongolid to do with this theme? Beside that there is no Mongolid Iranic people. Those are Uzbeks, Hazaras and many more. Before you start barking read Olaf Caroes, Gazetter´s and Minorskies discription of Mongolian and Turkic origins of Pushtuns and how many of them do not really differ from Mongols and Turks. In addition, a very good line for you would be Schurmann´s ''The Mongols of Afghanistan'' where he show you 60years old politicized wannabe Aryans who you really are. Beside that, your semite looking give us a good picture how bedouins from the desert of Arabia became your masters and live-givers and how deep Panjabi´s influence on Pashtun tribes and society goes. Posted Image. You are more Indo-Dravidian and Indo-Aryan like than Iranic. Today, in Kunduz, Faryab, Kunduz, Takhar and Samangan Pashtun women bear ''mongols'' on the base of Uzbakization. In Wardak on the base of Persian Hazarafication. What is your state on that? You need also prove your claims about ''Iranian nationalists are looking like Mongols or Turks'' and explain it to us. Because Ahmadinedjat looks more like a Caucasian than the monkey KharZai or Baber Gul, the Paki slave.
Posted Image

Pushtuns and Baluchs from Dera Ismael Khan - look to the first guy and second guy
Posted Image

Btw, what would you say to the following real Aryans (Iranic people of Turkmenistan)?
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
With best regards
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#47 User is offline   Parsistani Icon

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 08:19 PM

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DILEMA OF PASHTUN LEADERSHIP OF PAKISTAN IN THE NEW MILLENNIUM
The plight of the people of Federally Administered Tribal Areas of Pakistan (FATA) does not seems to be on the priority list of the present government and military establishment. FATA is bleeding, military operations in South Waziristan, Mohmand, Khyber and Orakzai agencies are underway killing innocent tribesmen while people like Wali ur Rehman are making press conferences from areas (Miranshah Fort) supposed to be under army control. The whole Fata and N-WFP is like a war zone, ordinary pashtuns are being killed both by Talibans and military secret agencies with impunity. Nearly half a million refugees from FATA are living in abject conditions, while government under orders from ARMY establishment is not allowing local and international NGOs like ICRC to help them. Journalists are completely barred from entering and reporting on FATA, Only government or military version of information is available to the international community.

Pakistan Army is using fighter Jets, gunship helicopters and long range artillery against civilians indiscriminately. More civilians are killed then the extremists elements in these operations, which are basically not targeting Talibans and other extremists rather ordinary civilians are killed on daily basis in the ongoing military operations in South Waziristan, Orakzai, Kurram, Khyber, Mohmand and Bajawar Agencies, besides in the FR regions of Bannu, Dera Ismail Khan, Lakki Marwat, Peshawar and Kohat. It is a clear violation of the Geneva Convention and International Community must rise to condemn it. If record is history, Pakistan has not killed a single Taliban leader in its 7 years army operations in FATA and in settle areas like SWAT, while the civilian deaths are about 30000, which is horrible reality beyond imagination. Molvi Fazlullah former Waali-e-Swat, Tariq Afridi, the King of Darra Adam Khel, Hakimullah Mahsood the Emir of the de-facto "Islamic Emirate of Waziristan. Haji Mangal Bagh Afridi the de-fecto Political Agent of Khyber Agency,Maulvi Faqir Mohammad the undisputed lord of the ring in Bajaur Agency, Umar Khalid the DC of districts of Charsadda and shabqadar, Molvi Gul Bahadar, Molvi Nazir and Jalaludin Haqani are presiding over the rotating Presidency of North Waziristan are all alive and no body dares to touch these fanatics. Even Baitullah Mehsood was killed by US in a drone attack rather than by Pakistan. Pakistan must be made accountable for its violations of all moral and international norms in its so called war against terrorism. According to a news report published in The News on January 15, 2010, 12 dead bodies of unidentified persons have been recovered from Akhurwal area of Darra Adam Khel, F.R. Kohat, which speak clearly of the atrocities committed by the security forces of Pakistan in the area in collusion with Talibans of Darra Adam Khel. It is after the publication of a Report by Human Rights Commission of Pakistan (HRCP) on the issue of Mass Graves in Swat and my assertions that the bodies of innocent people being killed in FATA are shifted in Trucks to other areas of Pakistan to be buried, have cautioned the secret agencies and now innocent people are being killed by these unbridled secret agencies and then thrown out in the streets. It is a clear cut genocide of Pashtuns and International Community should take notice ot it. Particularly, US must make Pakistan accountable for its help provided to the Talibans Fighting in Afghanistan. The reason for Every US and NATO soldier killed and wounded in Afghanistan can be traced to Pakistan which is actively supporting Talibans in Afghanistan by providing them training, sanctuaries and finances. It is a well known fact that Taliban Quetta Shura, Gul Badin Hikmat Yar Group and Haqqani Network of Noth Waziristan are supported by so-called rogue elements in ISI. It is ironical that how a super power of the world with a formidable secret service like CIA cannot detect the secret support in terms of training, logistics, finances and sanctuaries provided by Pakistan to Talibans fighting in Afghanistan. If the current trend and policies continue the US and its NATO allies are going to face the same fate as former USSR did. US tax payers must ask the White House to explain as to how the money is spent to finance the war on terrorism. Pakistan must be made accountable for the money it is receiving for war on Terror. The money aimed at eradicating terrorism should not be used to buy weapons to be used against US and Allied Forces in Afghanistan. This aid money should not be used to train and provide sanctuaries to Talians. As the tricks and treaturies of Pak-Army have been exposed in war on terror, now it is using different means to pressure US not to give priority to Civilian Government. While no protest were recorded for the military aid , it is openly expressing its reservations of Civilian Aid through Kerry-Lugar Bill. Hurdles have been surmounted to stop giving visas to personnel destined to monitor the aid provided under US $ 7.5 billions spanning over a period of 5 years. The reports are published deliberately about stopping of the US Diplomatic cars and the rude behaviour of US Citizens or diplomats and criticising the civilian government for releasing these diplomats. Concerted media campaign have been launched in Print and Electronic media by journalists and anchor persons on the pay-rolls of ISI are some of the clear examples how the military establishment is trying to flare public anger. The money given for war on terror is used to create anger among public against USA. In this way they are killing two birds with one bullet. On one hand they are black-mailing the civilian government and on the other they are bargaining with the US to evade accountability, stop civilian aid which can be used for the betterment of the people of Pakistan rather then going into the pockets of few Generals, and give them free hand in war on terror to pursue it in their own way and terms and conditions, no matter how detrimental it may be to the US and Pashtuns interests.

US Afghan centred-strategy has failed. Now, time has come for the US to re-think its military, political and diplomatic strategies in the region, by isolating the Al-Qaeda and Talibans Internationally with particular emphasis on Pakistan and Saudi Arabia who ae financing and training Talibans. If US is interested in the real solution of Afghan conflict it must attack the root cause and the root cause lies in Pakistan and Saudi Arabia.

The pashtun nationalists sentiments are on rise against Punjabi dominated army, which will lead to more chaotic situation in future. Pashtuns are being killed mercilessly and International community is a silent spectator. But, Punjab should know that it will not receive bouquet of flowers from Pashtuns, for their killing spree in FATA and N-WFP. Resultantly, the urban centers of Punjab, like Rawalpindi, Lahore and Multan have been attacked. For the first time in the history of Pakistan THE ARMY GHQ is attacked and the aura of invincibility of ARMY is gone. As written in my previous articles that Karachi is on the verge of explosion, that has turned into truth when 45 Shiite processionists were killed in a bomb blast and the resultant setting on fire the markets and shops indiscriminately by furious mobs or organised politico-criminal mafia in Karachi. It is to be noted that before setting on fire the shops and markets right from Light House to Bolton Market, the criminals gangs looted and plundered the markets. An illegal money market was also the target of these attackers, from where it is believed that billions and trillions of illegal currency was looted. Whether this money goes into the pockets of MQM gangsters or ISI-Tablian-Terrorist-Network, in both cases the losers will be Pashtuns because this money will either be used in Karachi or in Pakhtunkhwa to kill innocent pashtuns.

The phenomenon of target killing has re-surfaced and dozens of activists of different political parties, interest groups and religious groups are killed on daily basis. The MQM is threatening to resign and sit in the opposition if its workers are continued to be killed. While other political and religious parties & sectarian and ethnic groups are blaming MQM for killing their activists. The scale of killing cannot be gauged independently due to self-censor, threats and pressures from all the actors involved in the game of blood and flesh. Pashtuns are openly threatened to leave Karachi or face the music of death. Many pashtuns have been killed, their properties including shops, houses, cars and buses have been destroyed and hurdles are mounted to stop them earn their livelihood with dignity. Ironically, here too our Pashtun leadership is silent.

I would like to appeal once again to the leadership of Pashtuns particularly, Asfandyar Wali Khan, Afzal Khan Lala, Abdul Latif Afridi, Mahmood Khan Achakzai and Afrasiab Khattak to keep a keen eye on the fast changing situation in Pakistan and its implications for Pashtun nation. In his meetings with Americans and Europeans leaders, he should forward the case of Pashtuns in such a way so that Pashtun interests are protected in the future emerging situation in Pakistan particularly the plight of pashtuns in Punjab, Baluchistan and Karachi. He should also be aware of the fact that Pakistan is on the road to Balkanisation. While maintaining Anti-taliban policy, he should inform and encourage the moderate educated nationalist pashtuns to be prepared for any eventuality, in case that Balkanisation happen. Talibans and Inter Services Intelligence of Pakistan have clear-cut goals and objectives to use Pashtun youth as fodder for their mercenary war against Afghanistan, India, USA and NATO forces stationed in Afghanistan to eradicate terrorism and extremism. It is high time for the Pashtun leadership to evolve a new strategy for the Pashtun nation to protect them from the 1400 years old puritanical religious obscurantist ideology and the political and military strategic depth policy of anti pashtun elements. A grand Jirga of Pashtuns from Pakistan and Afghanistan is a need of the hour for creating a consensus on the future of Pashtuns. There is a need of a permanent body(Thank Tank) of Pashtuns like CENTRE FOR PASHTUN STRATEGIC STUDIES IN THE NEW MILLENNIUM, for devising plans for the protection of the interests of Pashtuns in the region based in UK, USA or France. We cannot put our head into sand like an ostrich and waiting others to define our destiny. We should rise to the occasion and demand our rights and fight for our rights politically and diplomatically on International forums. I would appeal in particular to Pashtun DIASPOR in Europe, UK, USA and Middle East to come forward with funding the Pashtun Lashkars that are fighting the oppression and Terrorism of Talibans in FATA and Pakhtunkhwa. They should also support morally and financially the Pashtun-Development-Oriented-Institutions like The Aryana Institute for Regional Research and Advocacy (AIRRA) and The Bacha Khan Education Foundation (BKEF). Pashtuns should be ready well equipped politically, financially, ideologically and diplomatically for a NEW STATE OF PAKHTUNKHWA. I have a vision of a Great State of Pashtun Nation which includes Afghanistan, certain parts of Baluchistan, complete FATA and and N-WFP.


Pashtuns today even claim on Balochistan, Land of Baluchs. How redicolous.

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I have a vision of a ''Great State of Pashtun Nation'' which includes Afghanistan, certain parts of Baluchistan, complete FATA and and N-WFP.

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#48 User is offline   Parsistani Icon

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 08:28 PM

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Karachi may face Bosnia-like ethnic cleansing


NEW YORK An official of a Pakistani civic organization fears Bosnia-like ethnic cleansing could take place Karachi, where over a thousand people have been killed in targeted political killings so far this year, according to a dispatch in The New York Times on Thursday.
Amber Alibhai, the Secretary General of Citizens for a Better Environment, was quoted by the Times as saying, If our government is not going to wake up, I fear Karachi will have ethnic cleansing like Bosnia. Theres no one to stop it. Whose going to stop it? The police? The army? They cant.
Drive-by shootings motivated by political and ethnic rivalries have reached new heights, correspondent Jane Perlez wrote from Karachi. Marauding gangs are grabbing tracts of land to fatten their electoral rolls. Drug barons are carving out fiefs, and political parties are commonly described as having a finger in all of it.
The Human Rights Commission of Pakistan recently reported that 1,350 people had been in Karachis in targeted killings, more than the number killed in terrorist attacks in all of Pakistan.
That tally has solidified Karachis grim distinction as Pakistans most deadly place, outside its actual war zones, where the army is embroiled in pushing back a Taliban insurgency, the dispatch said.
Indeed, it is the effect of the war, which has displaced many thousands of ethnic Pashtuns from the northern tribal areas and sent them to this southern port, that has inflamed Karachis always volatile ethnic balance. For the most part, extremists who torment the rest of Pakistan with suicide bomb attacks exploit the turmoil here to hide, recruit and raise funds.
The attack last week on the police headquarters by a suicide bomber that killed dozens was the exception, the first attack by extremists against a government institution in the city. Far more common have been killing by gangs affiliated with ethnic-based political parties hunting for turf in a city undergoing seismic demographic change. The MQM, which dominates Karachi, has a long association with violence. In 1992, the army moved into Karachi to suppress it, accusing it of a four-year rampage of torture and murder, The Times pointed out.
The latest challenge to the MQMs hold is the influx of Pashtuns who have fled the war to seek work and shelter in Karachis slums. Though the Pashtuns number some five million here now, they remain politically underrepresented, and the frustrations of the newcomers have increasingly been channeled into violent retribution by the Awami National Party, or ANP, the dispatch said. The two sides have set their gangs on each other. In August, after a senior MQM member was shot to death at a funeral, more than 100 people were killed in a weeklong orgy of violence.
The army, asked by some political parties to move in again and keep the peace, declined. During the by-election last month to fill the provincial assembly seat left vacant by the murder, more than 30 people were killed.
In that rampage, members of a self-styled peoples peace committee affiliated with the Pakistan Peoples Party, which leads the national government and considers this province, Sindh, its base, stormed an outdoor market on motorcycles and shot 12 Mohajir shopkeepers, the dispatch said, citing police.
Hours later, seven men of ethnic Baloch origin were killed, apparently in revenge for the deaths of the Mohajirs, Zafar Baloch, a spokesman for the peace committee, was quoted as saying.
The cost of Karachis violence hurts all of Pakistan. More liberal than the rest of the country in decorum and religious belief, Karachi is the economic engine of the nation, home to petrochemical plants, steel works, advertising agencies and high-tech start-ups.
The rich live in grand houses in gated communities paved with broad boulevards. The poor live in neighbourhoods like Lyari, a slum with little sanitation, fleeting electricity and hardscrabble roads that sits under an expressway.
Other mega cities in the developing world - like Shanghai and Mumbai, India - manage law and order through political leadership that is absent in Karachi, Farrukh Saleem, a political analyst, was quoted as saying. A scared, understaffed and in some cases complicit police force compounds the problem, the dispatch said. That was the message of a new report by a parliamentary committee that said 603 police officers had been assassinated since 1996. This year, 33 officers have been killed, the report said.
Many of these senior police officers were targeted, the report said, as retribution for the military action against the MQM in 1992, a sign of long memory of the MQM, it said.
But it is the persistent lack of Pashtun representation in the city and provincial governments that underlies the troubles, said Abdul Qadir Patel, the chairman of the committee that wrote the report and a Pakistan Peoples Party member of Parliament.
The Pashtuns are frustrated and the ANP says, Well fight back, Patel was quoted as saying. In rare candour for a Pakistani government document, his report said ethnicity, sectarianism, perceived insecurity due to demographic changes, gang war between mafias and clash of interests among workers of political parties have been the real cause of violence in Karachi.
Of 178 boroughs in the 18 towns of Karachi, only 4 are controlled by the Pashtuns. Of 168 seats in the provincial assembly of Sindh, where Karachi is located, the ANP, the party of the Pashtuns, has just 2. Based on Karachis demographics, Pashtuns could have up to 25 seats in the provincial legislature, Saleem wrote. That is political power way out of sync with demographic realities.
As part of the push and pull in the demographic war, the major political parties use armed thugs to commandeer public land so they can gerrymander election districts, said Mrs. Alibhai of the citizens group. One of her groups workers was killed last year trying to protect a park.
Land grabbing is used by political parties to increase their electoral mandate and enhance their financial position, she said.
A recent former M.Q.M. mayor of Karachi, Syed Mustafa Kamal, denied that his party, which has long been favoured by Washington for its secular outlook, was involved in the killing of Pashtuns.
Kamal, who as mayor from 2005 until this year is credited with extending running water to several Pashtun neighbourhoods, said Karachi was the rightful home of the Mohajirs.
The Pashtun, he said, harbour the Taliban and foment terrorist attacks. We are the victims, he insisted.
http://www.hamariweb..._nid348149.aspx

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#49 User is offline   Parsistani Icon

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 08:48 PM

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Hina Muhammad, right, and her sisters Sameen (centre) and Sana (left), mourn the death of their father and two brothers in an attack on Shershah scrap market in Karachi. Photographs: Declan Walsh for the Guardian

One bleeding city, two grieving families. In a shabby apartment block in northern Karachi, Hina Muhammad and her sisters sat quietly in a darkened room, shaded from the light but not the pain.

Days earlier armed men whirled through the city's Shershah market, a sprawling maze of scrap shops, shooting traders at their stalls. Among the 12 victims killed were Hina's father, Umair, and two brothers, Umair and Zubair, all members of city's Urdu-speaking mohajir community.

"They were everything to us," she whispered, choking back tears. "Now we are lost."

Across the city, on the other side of the ethnic divide, another woman was in mourning. Jan Bibi cradled a portrait of her son Rehman, a 30-year-old labourer who was snatched off the street in the hours following the Shershah attack.

The motive was ethnic: the Shershah killers were Baloch, as was Rehman; his abductors were presumed mohajirs in a suspected revenge attack for the earlier shooting. They slashed him with knives, shot him and dumped his body outside the Radio Pakistan building.

"They cut him like this," said his mother, her face hollow with grief, running a finger down her neck and across his face.

Karachi, Pakistan's combustible seaside metropolis, has a history of vicious street violence. But since 16 October at least 80 people have died in drive-by shootings, stabbings and murders. By one count more than 1,100 people have died on the streets this year – more than in Taliban suicide bombs across Pakistan.

A bewildering array of causes lies behind the violence, the most obvious of which are crime and ethnicity. With up to 18 million inhabitants, Karachi holds a powerful allure for drug lords, weapons smugglers and extortionists. Neighbourhoods are sliced into turf zones whose borders are ruthlessly enforced.

The Shershah killings were carried out by Mullah Raju, a Baloch gangster seeking to increase his take of the market extortion racket. His enforcers showed no mercy. As motorcyle-riding gunmen swarmed between the stalls, traders scrambled to the rooftops seeking protection. One saw his neighbour plead for mercy. "They told him to open his mouth," the trader said, too frightened to give his name. "Then they shot him through it."

Behind the street brutality lies a struggle that extends into the hushed offices of the city's most powerful men. Guns and politics are intimately connected in Karachi; police and city officials say the recent turmoil is part of a thinly-veiled battle for control of the city itself.

"This violence is not random, it's fully controlled by the politicians," said one senior police officer. "They can turn the tap on. And they can turn it off."

The driving rivalry is between the Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM), which represents the mohajir majority, and the Awami National Party (ANP), which speaks for the ethnic Pashtun minority.

The MQM fears its domination of city politics is threatened by an influx of Pashtun migrants from the conflict-hit north-west.

The two parties accuse each other of orchestrating the violence; others say both are responsible.

The link between guns and politics is most striking at the parties' headquarters, where suited men work in offices protected by steel doors, sandbags and burly, Kalashnikov-wielding guards.

At the ANP's headquarters, local leader Shahi Syed, a burly Pashtun with a clipped moustache, sat before a giant poster with the slogan "Peace on Earth". A closed-circuit television screen in the corner was trained on the front door.

The MQM was not a political party, he said: "They are a terrorist organisation".

The rhetoric was equally sharp at the heavily-guarded MQM headquarters, known as Nine Zero, where senior leader Faisal Sabzwari said the influx of Pashtuns was leading to the "Talibanisation" of Karachi – a reference to the arrest of militant suspects among the city's estimated four million Pashtuns.

"We must resist these extremists and exploiters of Karachi," he said.

When the rhetoric turns violent – as it has every few months this year — it is the innocent who die. After Raza Haider, a senior MQM parliamentarian, was gunned down at a funeral last August, the city was convulsed by a week of killings that left more than 100 people dead.

The latest violence was triggered by the byelection for Haider's seat on 16 October. The ANP boycotted the vote, the MQM won comfortably and 33 were dead by the time the polls closed.

The ruling Pakistan People's Party, the third leg of Karachi politics, might be expected to clean up the mess. It controls the government of Sindh province and the police force. But it is also engaged in Kalashnikov politics.

In Lyari, the main PPP stronghold in Karachi, the party's main backers are the Aman [peace] Committee, a self-styled community organisation widely considered a front for an armed group. Until last year the Aman Committee was led by Rehman Dakait, one of the city's most notorious gangsters, who had ties with the PPP.

Dakait was photographed with Benazir Bhutto before her death in 2007 and, more recently, with the Sindh home minister, Zulfikar Ali Mirza. He died in a shootout with police last year; his replacement is seen little in public.

"We are Bhutto lovers," said Peace Committee spokesman Shakeeb Baloch, proffering a business card emblazoned with Bhutto's picture. He denied any links to organised crime. "Not a single person on our committee has cases against him," he said.

The police, undermanned and over-politicised, are helpless to intervene. One senior officer said he could identify "80%" of the city's contract killers, but "only 1% are brought to justice".

There is intense political pressure on the senior officers, he said – "every arrest has to be approved" — while their juniors feared being gunned down in reprisal killings. Several complained of being targeted by MQM supporters. "We are stressed to the limit," he said.

The imbroglio is further complicated by national politics. The MQM is a member of the PPP-led coalition government, and has repeatedly threatened to withdraw its support from President Asif Ali Zardari — a move that could bring about the collapse of his government.

Most Karachi residents stress that the ethnic tensions are political and do not percolate down to their lives. "We get on just fine, among ourselves," said one Shershah trader.

As before, the violence has slowed to a trickle again. Last Monday two bodies wrapped in jute bags were dumped in a graveyard; on Tuesday a bullet-riddled corpse was discovered at a building site.

Few believe the worst is past. "This is just a pause," said one police officer. "It won't last long".

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 08:50 PM

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KARACHI: Awami National Party Sindh President Shahi Syed said on Friday he guarantees that “terrorists” take over Karachi, the way they have done so in Swat and the two Waziristan agencies.

Addressing journalists at the Karachi Press Club, Syed, who is also head of the non-political Pukhtoon Loya Jirga a.k.a. Pukhtoon Action Committee, said it’s not easy for the militants to find dens in Karachi because of its multi-ethnic environment and locked borders.

Syed said people who share the ideology of Taliban could be found among all ethnic groups living in Karachi and warned against labelling a particular community living in the city as Taliban.

“Don’t forcefully push the Pukhtoon community in the city towards Talibanisation,” Syed requested the political parties of Sindh, and added that Pukhtoons are here to serve the people of other nationalities.

“Pukhtoons serve as labourers in Sindh. We secure your bungalows, businesses and polish your shoes. All that we want in return is respect,” he said. “Call Pukhtoon ‘Khan Saab’ and he will serve you with more dedication.”

Syed said the Pukhtoons’ assets are their loyalty, dedication and labour skills, and that of the Urdu-speaking people is education.

“When our interests do not collide, then why is there all this fighting in Karachi,” Syed questioned.

Criticising the role of religious political parties, Syed said democracy has nothing to do with religion and it is better that religious personalities do not indulge in politics.

He rejected the impression that the ANP is involved in land grabbing, however he admitted that some individuals of his party were involved in such cases like Tariq Tareen and Ismail Mehsood, who have been ousted from the party.

He demanded the Sindh Assembly to pass a resolution declaring Karachi as a weapon-free zone.

Syed also demanded the federal government to call NWFP “Pukhtoonkhwa”.

“We want to include our identity on the map of Pakistan,” he said, and warned that the next generation of Pukhtoons could resort to violence to attain their identity.

Syed said the Sindh chief minister has promised to entertain some demands of the ANP.

Earlier, Syed in a press briefing had alleged that the ministers of two major political parties in the coalition government were interfering in the affairs of the Sindh labour ministry - a portfolio held by an ANP minister - and threatened that the ANP would quit the Sindh government in case the matter is not resolved.

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 08:54 PM

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KARACHI: Some car-riding criminals, allegedly, gang-raped a girl from the Pakhtoon community after abducting her from Clifton, a posh area of Karachi, and later left her at Sea View and fled, Geo News reported Monday.

Police have taken the statement of the victim.

According to TPO Clifton Tariq Dharejo, some unidentified criminals abducted the girl who was on her way back home after attending a birthday party in Clifton area and took her to unknown place, where the girl was allegedly raped.

Later on, they left her near Sea View in Clifton.

Police was informed about the incident, after which the girl was taken to Civil Hospital for medical check-up, where a lady police surgeon examined her.

Police took down the statement of the victimized girl, in which she put the number of criminals at four. However, the girl’s family stopped media from covering the incident.
http://www.geo.tv/12-20-2010/76116.htm

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 08:56 PM

Now I feel for the first time in my life sorry for innocent Pashtuns and those who work and live legally.

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Shahi Syed’s blood politics in Karachi
By Asad Ghauri • May 3rd, 2009 • Category: Politics • 18 Comments

29th April 2009 once again a worst day for karachi, 2 member of MQM shoot dead in Zarina Colony(Karachi) after that riot begin in Karachi, as we know that Shahi Syed has trapped ANP by making Pakhtoon Action Committee (Loya Jirga) through which he is trying to prove that he is the representative of Pakhtuns in Karachi, Pakhtun are living in Karachi from long time as the first Pathan Mahajir clashed were held in 1986, mostly Pakhtun population of Karachi lives on Small hills of Karachi and all of those belongs to government where they are living as illegally.

Now they had taken the plains of Sohrab Goth, Scheme 33, Gulistan e Jauhar, most of these areas of Karachi are allocated to different Housing Societies and pakhtuns fleeing from NWFP and Afghanistan are occupying these places, its easy to understand that the largest Mafia in Karachi is Traffic Mafia operated largely by Pakhtuns, Unlincensed drivers, routes without route permit, un tax paid commercial vehicles can easily seen in Karachi with Excess loading, police is earning a handsome amount from it, in 2007 CDGK planned to ban Two Stroke rickshaw, which is already banned in large area LAHORE, but when CDGK planned ANP hold a protest against this decission as these are silent killer but no one cares.

This clips shows threat of shahi syed what he wants to do with karachi city http://www.jasarat.c...headings/07.gif

He is trying to gain political millage on Blood of Pakhtuns in Karachi, nothing more than this.

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 09:00 PM

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The recent gun battles across Karachi demonstrate that there’s a lot more to Pakistan’s problems than dealing with the Taliban, writes Mustafa Qadri

There were a number of Kodak moments for the presidents of Afghanistan and Pakistan in Washington last week. But back in their respective countries, the world’s media were transfixed by images of civilians suffering from the unending war with the Taliban. In Afghanistan the images were of the horrific bombardment of civilians in the southern province of Farah. And next door in Pakistan, there is little doubt that army operations against the Taliban along the foothills of the Himalayas are having a devastating impact on tribal societies.

Meanwhile, far to the south of the country, a long way from the tribal areas, the last couple of weeks have seen outbreaks of serious ethnic violence in the streets of Karachi. Around 35 people died in gun battles between political activists from two warring parties, with many bystanders among the dead.

But while some are quick to see the violence as further evidence of Taliban activity, there is much more to it than that.

Karachi, the country’s largest city and economic hub on the southern coast, is home to a large Pashtun population. In the plush suburbs of Clifton and Defence, it isn’t uncommon to see old Pashtun men with their signature blue security uniforms and flowing beards holding what appear to be ancient shotguns outside the mansions and shopping complexes of the wealthy. Poor migrants from the North West Frontier Province, they have been coming here for decades — since well before the anti-Soviet jihad in Afghanistan — in search of a livelihood.

Their migration is one consequence of the severe shortage of opportunities in the underdeveloped village communities most come from. Yet there is deep mistrust of the Pashtun among some of Karachi’s citizens, for whom the strength of the Taliban in Pashtun areas like the North Western Frontier Province colours their attitudes to the Pashtun people as a whole.

“All of our problems started with the Pashtuns,” says fruit seller Nadeem, himself a Sindhi, the native ethnic community of the province of Sindh in which Karachi is located.

Politicians are adept at tapping into sentiments like this, and anti-Pashtun feeling is being most vigorously exploited by the Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM), the country’s only mainstream party built around the ethnic identity of the “Muhajir” — Muslims who arrived from India following Partition in 1947. According to MQM leaders, the Pashtun community threatens Karachi with “Talibanisation”.

It’s mentioned less frequently, of course, that the vast majority of Pashtun here support the secular Awami National Party (ANP) that has for decades had close ties with the United States, and been strongly critical of elements within Pakistan for not doing enough to control the Taliban. As well, ANP activists have been violently targeted by the Taliban in the North West Frontier Province. And now, although the ANP swept into power in the North West Frontier Province on the back of a landslide general election victory in February 2008, with the Taliban spreading throughout the province the ANP’s hold on government outside Peshawar is tentative.

But none of that has stopped the MQM from claiming that the ANP has created a safe haven for the Taliban in this southern port city. MQM leader Altaf Hussain even went as far as demanding that the Pakistan army and its powerful Inter-Services Intelligence investigate alleged collusion between the Taliban and the ANP in Karachi.

Hussain himself is no stranger to controversy. In the early 1990s the MQM leader fled Pakistan for the United Kingdom after several of his relatives were murdered in political vendetta attacks. As a result, Hussain, with his big tuft of hair and large tinted glasses, speaks to his members via satellite with an air reminiscent of the Christian Phalange leaders of Lebanon.

When Hussain’s party controlled Karachi in the 1990s, the city was engulfed by Mafia-style terror that saw many kidnapped, tortured and murdered in a range of extortion rackets.

One random encounter I recently had with a Karachi taxi driver illustrates the casual, widespread experience of violence in those days, and why not all locals are buying Hussain’s line that the ANP are in league with the Taliban, or that the city’s problems are their fault. The driver, Asif, described to me his kidnapping and torture in 1994, during that period.

“It happened just before I was going to return [to my village in the Punjab],” says Asif. A group of men took him from the street at gunpoint to a cell and tortured him until he told them where he’d put the money he’d saved for his family’s train tickets home. Asif was left bound in a dark, rank-smelling cell for another 24 hours before eventually being released.

To this day, he blames the MQM for the ordeal, just as many Karachi residents blame them — and not the city’s Pashtun population — for the current mayhem.

The recent havoc in the streets is just the latest violent incident between the Pashtun and MQM-supporting Muhajir communities. Similar clashes occurred in Karachi in early December last year, immediately following the Mumbai attacks in India. Many ordinary citizens still believe Indian intelligence to have been behind the tensions on that occasion, but no concrete evidence has ever emerged.

On Tuesday further potential bloodshed was averted when strikes planned to commemorate the second anniversary of the bloody clashes in 2007 were cancelled. Both the ANP and the MQM backed the strikes until the Chief Minister of Sindh Syed Qaim Ali Shah, a stalwart of Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari’s Pakistan Peoples Party, called a public holiday on Tuesday.

That move may have been enough to quell the situation that time, but the potential for further violence along ethnic lines remains, whether Taliban-related or not. And it’s not limited to Karachi.

In the north, a huge crisis is brewing, as Pakistan tries to cope with the enormous numbers of Pashtuns displaced by the conflicts on both sides of the Afghan border, living in conditions of poverty and despair. There are now around two million people sheltering in mosquito-ridden, makeshift tent camps throughout the North West Frontier Province.

The refugee camp of Kutcha Guri outside Peshawar is one of these — a sprawling shamble of tents and water pipes sitting on the baked, red clay that leads off towards the Khyber Pass and Afghanistan. The camp had been built for Afghan refugees in previous decades. Now it houses refugees from within Pakistan itself.

When I visited it late last year refugee Karim Jan expressed his frustration at their situation, saying “We feel betrayed.”

Pakistan faces a huge challenge if it wants to prevent further radicalisation of these people.
http://mustafaqadri....ces-in-karachi/

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 09:18 PM

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Hundreds killed in national-ethnic violence in Pakistan’s largest city
By Ali Ismail
3 December 2010

The Human Rights Commission of Pakistan recently reported that more than 1,350 people have died so far this year in ethnic-political violence in Karachi. This includes 169 killings just in the month of October.

Most of the violence arises from “turf wars”—for land, control of drug and other rackets, and political influence—between leaders and activists of the three major parties in Pakistan’s national coalition government. There are concerns that the escalating violence could ultimately trigger the collapse of the Pakistan Peoples Party-led coalition and exacerbate centrifugal tensions within the Pakistani federal state.

While the gangs responsible for the violence are associated with rival political parties, many of those killed are not gang member or even party activists. Rather they are ordinary people—in the main, workers and slum-dwellers—who are targeted because of their ethnicity.

Nearly every day new bodies are found in this port city of 18 million. Although the political violence in Karachi is largely ignored in the Pakistani and international press, it has resulted in more deaths this year than the attacks and bombings carried out by Taliban and Taliban-aligned groups throughout Pakistan. “There are 30 to 40 bodies some weeks,” one Karachi morgue worker told Reuters. “When just one member of a party is killed, I know the other [party] will respond and there could be many more deaths.”

In October, 13 people, most of them Muhajirs (the Urdu-speaking descendants of people who migrated to Sindh from north India following the 1947 communal partition of the Indian subcontinent), were killed in a brazen attack on Karachi’s enormous Shershah auto parts market. The attack was blamed on Baloch gangsters with ties to the Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP). A BBC news report cited witnesses to the shooting as saying that the attackers had demanded to know who was Urdu-speaking and then fired at them. Within hours of the Shershah attack, seven innocent Baluch men were killed in revenge attacks.

On November 17, three people were killed and six injured when a gun battle broke out between rival groups in the city’s Lyari area, according to The Nation. On November 22, ten people were killed in ethnic-political violence in various parts of the sprawling city. The bullet-ridden body of one youth was found hanging in North Karachi and another unidentified person was shot dead by unknown assailants in the same area, according to Samaa News.

Pakistan’s largest city, Karachi is also the country’s economic engine. It contributes more than half of the government’s total revenue and represents 25 to 30 percent of the country’s GDP. The political-ethnic violence often disrupts commerce and industrial output and sections of the elite are concerned about its long-term impact on the economy, including foreign investment, since most foreign companies that operate in Pakistan are headquartered in Karachi.

The city is also vital for the US-led occupation of Afghanistan. At least half of all the food and fuel consumed by the US forces in Afghanistan is funneled through Karachi.

The vast majority of the city’s inhabitants must contend with mass unemployment, poverty, spiraling food and energy prices, and electricity load-shedding (power cuts). Many of the city’s poor residents live in slums like Lyari, with little to no access to basic necessities like sanitation. Orangi Township, which is said to be the largest slum in Asia, is located in Karachi.

While the majority of the city’s residents struggle to make ends meet, Karachi’s elite live in enormous houses located in gated communities. These wealthy neighborhoods have been largely insulated from the violence.

Karachi has long been plagued by criminal gangs, drug lords, arms dealers, and extortionists willing to use any means to guard their turf. During the 1980s—when Pakistan, under the dictatorship of General Zia-ul Haq, worked hand-in-glove with the US in supporting the mujahideen in Afghanistan—Karachi was inundated with guns and heroin.

In many cases, Karachi’s criminal organizations are directly linked to political parties. The three main parties involved in Karachi’s national-ethnic violence are the PPP, the Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM), and the Awami National Party (ANP).

The PPP, led by Pakistan’s almost universally despised president, Asif Ali Zardari, is the country’s largest political party. It has long been associated with, and made appeals to, Sindhi nationalist sentiments. (Karachi is located in the province of Sindh, which is predominantly Sindhi-speaking, but Sindhi-speakers make up less than 10 percent of Karachi’s population.) The PPP machine in Karachi is said to use gangs drawn from the city’s Baloch minority to carry out targeted killings of ethnic Muhajirs with the aim of countering the MQM’s dominance of the city and its government.

The MQM was founded as an exclusivist Muhajir party. Today it claims to be open to people from all ethnic groups, but it continues to function as an ethnic-based bourgeois party, which serves the interests of the Muhajir elite while exploiting the fears and grievances of the Muhajirs over the communal polarization and violence its politics have helped produce.

The ANP is a Pashtun nationalist party. It forms the provincial government in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (formerly the North West Frontier Province) and purports to defend the interests of Karachi’s large and growing Pashtun minority.

The Urdu-speaking Muhajirs became the largest ethnic group in Karachi, shortly after they began arriving in the city, having left north India due to the 1947 communal partition of the subcontinent into a Muslim Pakistan and a predominantly Hindu India. The more prosperous and better-connected of the Muhajirs quickly took the place of the large number of Hindu merchants and shopkeepers who fled Karachi, along with virtually the entire Hindu population, in 1947-48.

Whilst the vast majority of the Muhajirs are poor toilers like other Pakistanis, Sindhi nationalists and others have focused on the predominant ethnic identity of Karachi’s business class to channel the anger born of capitalist exploitation in a reactionary communal direction. The MQM, meanwhile, has not shied away from promoting the Muhajirs as superior to Karachi’s other “poor” and “backward” ethnic groups.

Karachi’s first significant ethnic riots were between Muhajirs and Pashtuns. They erupted in late 1964 and early 1965 when Gohar Ayub Khan, son of dictator Marshall Ayub Khan, launched attacks against Muhajir communities, in revenge for their support for Fatima Jinnah, sister of Muhammad Ali Jinnah, in Ayub Khan’s staged 1965 presidential “election.”

Years later, the Sindhi-first policies of the PPP increased tensions between Muhajirs and Sindhis. Large-scale riots broke out in 1972 when the Sindh Assembly, which was controlled by Sindhi-speaking PPP members, pushed through a bill declaring Sindhi to be the province’s official language. Numerous protests were held against the bill throughout Muhajir-dominated areas of Karachi. Muhajir resentment was also stoked by the PPP government’s adoption of a quota system guaranteeing a set number of university places and public sector jobs to people from rural areas. Under conditions where Sindhis constituted more than 90 percent of the province’s rural population and the Muhajirs were almost exclusively urban, this constituted in practice, if not in name, an ethnic quota system. Three decades later the divisive quota system remains.

The MQM was created in 1984, emerging out of the first Muhajir political organization, the All Pakistan Muhajir Student Organization, which had been created in 1978 by Altaf Hussain. Hussain has lived in London since the early 1990s , but he remains the unchallenged leader of the MQM.

At its birth, the MQM worked in concert with the Zia-ul Haq dictatoship, which faced especially tenacious opposition in Sindh. It quickly emerged as Karachi’s largest party and seized control of various criminal rackets, thus enabling it to combine political patronage with illicit activities, to tighten its grip on power. Later, the MQM came into conflict with the Pakistani military and state bureaucracy, which accused the MQM of conniving with Pakistan’s arch-enemy, India. For two years, beginning in June 1992, the military mounted a major operation aimed at crushing the MQM., placing Karachi under virtually military occupation.

Throughout its existence the MQM has promoted anti-Sindhi and anti-Pashtun sentiments and used communal and political violence in order to maintain its grip on political power in Karachi.

Over the past quarter century it has repeatedly entered into shaky, short-lived alliances with Pakistan’s two major parties, the PPP and Nawaz Sharif’s Pakistan Muslim League. When the Bush-supported dictator General Pervez Musharraf sought to give a democratic façade to his rule, the MQM rushed to its offer support. As a result, the MQM was given a share of power in both the national and Sindh governments from 2002 on. In May 2007, the MQM fomented violence in which several dozen people were killed to prevent Pakistan’s dissident Chief Justice, Iftikhar Chaudhry, from speaking in Karachi. Musharraf had sacked Chaudhry as head of Pakistan’s Supreme Court because he feared that Chaudhry would not rubber stamp a phony presidential election slated for later in the year. (See: Pakistani president seeks to drown mounting opposition in blood).

However, in early 2008, when the Musharraf regime unraveled, the MQM was able to strike a deal with the PPP, which needed allies to form a national government. As a result, the MQM is a junior partner of the PPP in both Pakistan’s national and Sindh governments.

A factor that has facilitated the alliance between the PPP, with its roots in rural Sindh, and the Karachi-based MQM, is their perceived joint interest in marginalizing the ANP in Sindhi politics.

The bulk of the political violence in Karachi in recent years has revolved around competition between Muhajir gangs backed by the MQM and Pashtun gangs associated with the ANP. This conflict has been exacerbated by Pakistan’s participation in the US war in Afghanistan—a war that all three parties, the PPP, the MQM, and ANP support. At the US’ behest, the Pakistani military has waged a counter-insurgency war against Taliban and Taliban-aligned militias in much of Pakistan’s northwest. The war has displaced hundreds of thousands of ethnic Pashtuns, many of whom have found their way to Karachi.

There are now over 5 million Pashtuns in the city, with many struggling to secure shelter and employment in the slums. Pashtuns in Karachi must also deal with discrimination and anti-Pashtun sentiment encouraged and promoted by the MQM.

The ANP, meanwhile, has been busy exploiting the legitimate grievances of the Pashtuns for its own reactionary ends. The ANP incites hatred against the Muhajirs and other ethnic groups. Recently it has been campaigning against the issuance of national identity cards to “Bengalis” residing in Karachi. (Many of the Bengalis are in fact Urdu-speaking Biharis who moved to East Pakistan following partition and then to Karachi following the breakaway of Bangladesh in 1971) There are as many as two millions Bengalis living in Karachi, and the community has been courted by the MQM, leading the ANP to charge that the MQM is patronizing “foreigners” to gain votes.

Last August, over 100 people, mostly Pashtuns, were killed in a weeklong orgy of communal violence when a senior member of the MQM and Sindh Assemblyman, Raza Haider, was shot dead at a funeral.

The ANP has called on the military to rein in the MQM, and some ANP members have even called for a military operation in the city along the lines of the counter-insurgency campaign in the northwest of the country.

“Without an army operation here, the whole of Pakistan will be brought down,” Shahi Syed, head of the ANP in Karachi, told McClatchy Newspapers. “Karachi is the heart of Pakistan.”

The ANP’s acting president, Haji Mohammad Adeel, made a similar statement in Pakistan’s Senate, when he asked why troops can be called in to deal with Islamacist militants in Malakand, but not to end the violence in Karachi.

While the MQM does not want the military interfering in what it views as its Karachi fiefdom, Hussain made a speech in August in which he indicated he would be ready to collaborate with the military were it to unseat the current PPP-led government.

When Sindhi flood survivors from outside Karachi tried to find refuge in the city during last summer’s devastating floods, the MQM strongly objected and at its instigation the city’s police force opened fire on some of the helpless refugees.

The violence in Karachi demonstrates the venal character of the Pakistani bourgeoisie and all its political parties. For decades, the political representatives of the Pakistani ruling class have engaged in reactionary national-ethnic and religious appeals in order to divert popular anger over chronic poverty and immense social inequality into regressive channels and muster support for their sordid struggles for pelf and power
http://www.wsws.org/.../kara-d03.shtml

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 09:26 PM

The MQM is a mafia that controls drug and land. increased Pashtun migration, plus Pashtun seeking piece of this pie has led to these problems

its basically a turf war for criminals, with electoral party leaders invested in it. it is a dangerous mixture

btw, im a Kakar pakhtun, pakhtun on both sides, and i look iranic. i know many tajiks who look mongoloid. you need to stop these references because theyre irrelevant


if you want to talk about historical injustices, how many people amir timur killed? how many people uzbek killed? how many iranic people, turko mongol tribes killed?

dont be stupid and nit pick history
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Posted 24 December 2010 - 10:23 PM


Pashtun ANP Terrorists against MQM Terrorists


ANP Karachi Pathans Historic Rally 2 may 2010


Terrorist ANP attacks MQM Terrorists
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Posted 24 December 2010 - 10:48 PM

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The MQM is a mafia that controls drug and land. increased Pashtun migration, plus Pashtun seeking piece of this pie has led to these problems


Aren´t Pashtuns druglords and land-grabbers for many centuries? How the Taliban finance their movement? Who are those people growing poppies in Afghanistan and Pakistan? The MQM is criminal as Pashtuns are. But I guess Psahtuns are worse because they are tribal-centric.

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its basically a turf war for criminals, with electoral party leaders invested in it. it is a dangerous mixture


So is ANP and many other groups. Every medaille have two sides.

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btw, im a Kakar pakhtun, pakhtun on both sides, and i look iranic. i know many tajiks who look mongoloid. you need to stop these references because theyre irrelevant


Of course you are a Kakar ''Pashtun'', today. Yesterday, known as Gajjar and Gujjar you were one of the main Indian population of Peshawar valley who were overran by maradeurs of Pashtun thugs who took your lands and homes and Pashtunized you. If you look Iranic and not Indian or Indo-Pakistani than show us a picture of yourself. And yes you ''know'' :rolleyes: . You have forgotten many Pashtuns from Khalajis to Turakhels, Jaji, Mangals, Jadarins, Turkkhel have asiatic origine and in the same numbers many are Arabs. Why could otherwise the once small Pashtun nation become such numerous? The same goes for Greater Persian nation, Arabs, Kurds, Scottish people and many more. The references I wrote to you are facts and can´t get ignored. Because in a sooner future there won´t be any Pashtun or Pashtu and Pakhtuspeakers. There will be Chagataispeakers, Persianspeakers, Urduspeakers, Sindhispeakers and many more with a Pashtun line somewhere in within the family. I do not want to offend you because this anyway.

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if you want to talk about historical injustices, how many people amir timur killed? how many people uzbek killed? how many iranic people, turko mongol tribes killed?


You are right. But Timurs and Uzbeks background were and are even today in many aspects that of the wild barbarian stepe nomads who later became civilised by the local Dehqans (Iranians, Kurds, Tajiks, Azeris, Greecs). But your situation is different. Tough majority of Pashtuns do not differ in their customs from Djingis Khan, Timur, Shaibanids and others who killed millions, they were at least living between three high civilisations, the Persian, the Indian and the Chinese. But what have they experienced from them? Nothing and because of their backwardness and stupidity, additioned with their fake (islamic) identity they caused the death of at least 15 mio people in Central Asia and South-East Asia. Muslims vs Muslims, Muslims vs Hindus, Muslims vs Christians, Muslims vs trees, Muslims vs stones, Muslims vs ''mongols'' and so on. It was the father of Pashtuns, Ahmad Shah Baba Multani Panjabi who caused the deep hatred between Indian Hindus and Indian Muslims with a very great influence on the future policies that gave birth to Pakistan, Bangladesh and other smaller states. He killed also in masses many people. Same Abdurrahman Khan killed ca. 3 million people, Pashtuns, Uzbeks, Hazaras (65% of the nation were killed), Tajiks and many more and many hundred thousands, specially Tajiks left their homes in eastern- and southern Afghanistan which are today occupied by Pashtuns. You should also be careful with your statement. You see, we can also ask for juistice and democracy but why Khar-Zai do not it if it´s not in the interest of Pashtuns and others? Those days of Timur is gone which was the 14th/15th century - middle-age, today we live in the 21th century but majority of Pashtuns do not want to be part of civilisations as long they can´t have a power. And if they get power they ask for more. They ask you for milk and you give them a glass or a package milk but they want the cow-self and still are keeping their backwardness. Where is today Afghanistan standing in the world and why? Because of Pashtuns. I do not tell you that to insult you but because it´s the facts you can read in any books, started with our own native famous and autorativ historians Muhammad Ghulam Ghobar, Tamim Ansari and Kohzad.

Btw, you as a Pakistani Pashtun nationalist. What is your opinion on Baluchistan? Do you want it to be occupied by immigrant Pashtuns, too or do you wnat to give them their rights for an independant Baluchistan? Because right now the Baluchs self do not wish Pashtuns in their provinces, not even in Karachi which became a Baluch Sindhi-speaking city who hunt Pashtuns.
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#58 User is offline   Parsistani Icon

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 01:31 PM

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Bomb hits Karachi University, injures 16

A bomb has exploded at the University of Karachi's cafeteria when the students were having lunch, leaving more than a dozen people injured.


At least 16 people were wounded on Tuesday when the bomb reportedly planted under a tree detonated outside the canteen, a Press TV correspondent reported.

Rescue workers rushed to the university after the blast and moved the injured to a nearby hospital.

Heavy contingents of police and law enforcing agents cordoned off the blast site in Pakistan's largest city and an investigation is underway.

Karachi is home to numerous ethnic groups and has been wracked by clashes between rival ethnic and political factions for much of the 1990s.

At least nine other people were killed and several others injured in similar attacks across the volatile city.

Last year, two bomb blasts at the International Islamic University in Islamabad killed six people, including the bombers, and wounded at least 20.

RZS/HRF/AKM

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Posted 30 December 2010 - 05:14 PM

View PostParsistani, on 24 December 2010 - 08:19 PM, said:

Pashtuns today even claim on Balochistan, Land of Baluchs. How redicolous.

There are parts of present balochistan like quetta and its adjoining districts which were always pakhtun majority.Some pakhtun nationalists want pakhtun dominated areas of north balochistan to be integrated with pakhtunkhwa province.
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Posted 30 December 2010 - 06:20 PM

View Postasif1986, on 30 December 2010 - 05:14 PM, said:

There are parts of present balochistan like quetta and its adjoining districts which were always pakhtun majority.Some pakhtun nationalists want pakhtun dominated areas of north balochistan to be integrated with pakhtunkhwa province.


Quetta was never part of Pashtun land. Once it was only populated by eastern-Tajik Ormuris, a branch of them today known as Kasi and are probably related with the Waziris, who are self not original Pashtuns, and a significant numbers of Brahuis, with many communities of Arabs. In the earlist islamic middle-age Baluch Nomads came there and settled in the southern parts (10th to 12th century). The first Pashtuns presence is attested from the 16th century by the Hotaks (who themself are the result of a confederation of Baluch, Brahui and Pashtun minor tribes from Quetta, not Kandahar!). Your claim about Pashtun dominance is not holdable. If you cound the thousand of Pashtun immigrants from Kandahar and Hilmand than they are not part of Quetta. Quetta´s main population are still Balochs (f.ex. the ''Ahmadzai'' Baluchs or ''Yusufzai'' Baluchs), followed by Pashtuns. Urdu-speaker make also a large part of the population. Interesting is for the region arround Quetta is that Quetta, after Karachi, is the main centre of Baluchs where the majority of them are concentrated there. Take in mind that the majority of all Baluchs within Pakistan live in Karachi. The Pashtun nationalists do not want the northern part of Baluchistan, but they want to annex all Baluchistan (LAND OF BALUCHS) while they have their Pashtunistan, Land of Pashtuns. They believe getting an axcess to the sea they will profite from it and call traitor-likes Baluchs as ''proud Afghans''. They never were Awghans nor related with Awghans who represent the criminal society of Pakistan. Pashtun nationalists should take it in mind they are maybe numerous to Baluchs but Baluchs are the better warriors. They dealt with Ahmaq Khan Abdali and his sons and forefathers and they will deal with modern Pashtuns, too.
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