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Imran to stage sit-in against NATO supplies

#1 User is offline   asif1986 Icon

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 10:17 AM

http://dailymailnews.../index.php?id=3

LAHORE – The Chairman of Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) Imran Khan has called upon all the political parties, civil society, traders, lawyers and people from all walks of life to participate in the two-day sit-in in Peshawar today (Saturday).

PTI Chief said that it was the responsibility of every countryman to attend the sit-in for the country’s integrity and sovereignty and give the world a massage that Pakistani nation could never compromise on national freedom and sovereignty.

The two-day sit in will commence today (Saturday) to cut up the supply line of Nato forces in Afghanistan to press Pakistani and US governments to stop drone attacks killing innocent people.

“We should show this to entire world that we are ready to lay our lives for dignity of our country,” he said.

He criticized the government for its pro-US policies saying the rulers had sold the country’s sovereignty for American dollars and they have no business with the lives of innocent people but only to please the US and its allies. “How the drone strikes could be stopped if the government remains a silent spectator about the issue,” Imran Khan said.


Major political parties

extend support


NOWSHERA – Various major political parties have announced to support the Pakistan Tehrik-e-Insaf (PTI) protest sit-in to be held here in Peshawar on April 23 and 24 against US drone attacks in the tribal areas
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#2 User is offline   asif1986 Icon

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 10:21 AM

http://www.presstv.i...ail/176248.html

Pakistanis to block NATO supply trucks


Thousands of protesters have held a rally in northwest of Pakistan as part of plans to block trucks carrying supplies to NATO forces in the neighboring Afghanistan.


The Pakistan Tehrik-e-Insaf party (Justice Movement) organized a sit-in in the Peshawar city of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province to cut off the supply line of US-led troops in protest against the killing of people in the non-UN-sanctioned US drone attacks in Pakistan's tribal areas, a Press TV correspondent reported Saturday.

The protesters are moving from the capital Islamabad and Peshawar, which is the main supply route for NATO forces amid reports that NATO has suspended its supply for two days to avert a face-off with the protesters.

The demonstration comes just a day after two US drones fired six missiles at a house in Spinwam in Mir Ali subdivision of North Waziristan tribal region, killing 25 people, including women and children, according to local reports.

Meanwhile, Zahid Hussain, a provincial leader and Secretary Information of the Tehrik-e-Insaf, told Press TV that the party has finalized arrangements for the demonstrations to be continued for two days (April 23-24) against recent unauthorized US drone attacks on the tribal areas bordering Afghanistan. The official stated that the main objective of the protest is to pressure Pakistani and US governments to put a halt to drone attacks, which have left many innocent people dead.

Public outcry is running high against the non-UN-sanctioned strikes and there are no signs that the US will stop the attacks despite Pakistan's protest.

The US conducted a record 124 drone attacks in the tribal areas of Pakistan in 2010, more than double the number of Predator strikes conducted in 2009. The assaults killed 1,184 people in 2010, compared to 2009's death toll of 760 in 53 attacks, according to Pakistan's The Nation newspaper.

On April 20, Pakistani Chief of the Army Staff General Ashfaq Parvez Kayani said the US drone strikes in Pakistan are undermining his country's counter-terrorism efforts.

"Drone strikes are not only undermining our national effort against terrorism but turn public support against our efforts, which remains the key to success," Kayani complained during a meeting with Admiral Mike Mullen, the Chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Washington claims the stepped-up pace of US-led aerial offensives in Pakistan's North Waziristan tribal district plays a pivotal role in eliminating Taliban militants, who are perceived to have found a safe haven in tribal belts bordering Afghanistan.
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#3 User is offline   Parsistani Icon

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 01:14 PM

Kill them all with a drone and than look for Uubekistan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan and the sea way.
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#4 User is offline   shinno Icon

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 01:41 PM

back after long time. hope your all doing well.

Nato has already stopped the supply for 2 days so this will have no impact on them.
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Posted 23 April 2011 - 08:19 PM

http://www.nytimes.c...R.html?ref=asia
Security and Development in Afghanistan’s North provided by local Tajik warlords

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In Hairatan, a shabby river port on the northern border with Uzbekistan, brand new fuel storage tanks and a new railway line, Afghanistan’s first, are spreading out amid the desert scrub.

The port is now the entry point for 80 percent of Afghanistan’s fuel imports, including up to half of the fuel supplies for American and NATO forces, said Muhammad Ayub Ghazanfar, an ethnic Uzbek whose family business is the region’s biggest importer of fuel and foodstuffs.

Much of that business has come north because of attacks on convoys through Pakistan, he added. “The only reason for Mazar’s progress,” he said, “is because of the security.”


Quote

In a country still gripped by war, the families picnicking around the azure-domed shrine in the central square here are perhaps the clearest sign that this northern provincial city has distinguished itself as one of the most secure places in the country. An estimated one million people visited Mazar-i-Sharif for Afghan New Year celebrations in March and in the weeks after without incident.

It helps, of course, that Mazar-i-Sharif and the surrounding Balkh Province lie far from the Pakistani border and the heartland of the Taliban insurgency in southern and eastern Afghanistan. But there is something else that sets Mazar-i-Sharif apart, almost everyone here agrees, and that is the leadership of the provincial governor, Atta Muhammad Noor.

Some regard Mr. Noor, 46, a former mujahedeen commander and an ethnic Tajik, as a thinly disguised warlord who still exercises an unhealthy degree of control across much of the north and who has used that influence to grow rich through business deals during his time in power since 2001.

But there is little doubt that Mr. Noor has also managed to do in his corner what President Hamid Karzai has failed to achieve in other parts of Afghanistan: bring development and security, with a good measure of public support, to regions divided by ethnic and political rivalries.

For that, Mr. Noor has slowly gained the attention and support of Western donors and become something of a study in what kind of governing, imperfect as it is, produces results in Afghanistan.

Since 2001, American and other Western officials have tried to buttress the central government under Mr. Karzai as a means of securing Afghanistan by weakening powerful regional warlords and bringing lucrative customs revenues into the state coffers. Mr. Karzai has installed political allies as governors around the country, yet many have failed to provide security or services and have indulged in corruption, alienating Afghans from the government at all levels.

Supporters of Mr. Noor say he has made the transition from bearded guerrilla fighter to business-suited manager. Though many presume he has used his position of power to make money, Mr. Noor speaks out against corruption and has apparently checked it enough to maintain public support. That support has enhanced security, and the security has allowed others to prosper, too, another important reason that he has maintained popular backing.

Such is his support that Mr. Noor is the one governor whom President Karzai has been unable to replace, or has chosen not to, even after Mr. Noor campaigned against him in the presidential election last year.

A skillful politician, Mr. Noor has also gained the upper hand over some formidable political rivals, solidifying his power in the region as they left to take up posts in Kabul, including even Mr. Karzai’s ally, the Uzbek militia leader Abdul Rashid Dostum.

In an interview in his lavish party offices, Mr. Noor denied rumors that he takes a cut of every investment that flows through the region and said he made his money legally — he has interests in oil, wood trading, fertilizer and construction, among other things. “In legal ways, I did do a lot of work,” he said. “I did my own business.”

Instead, he criticized Mr. Karzai’s management of the country and said the president never followed through on plans to regulate revenue collection, policing and relations between the central government and the provinces. He derided Mr. Karzai’s efforts to curb corruption, saying the president should not appoint corrupt people in the first place.

Mr. Karzai had also failed to act as the Taliban insurgency spread into the north in recent years, he said.

“If we don’t have the cooperation of the people, you cannot stop it,” he said of the insurgency. “There has to be a deep contact between the people and the government. If officials are not embezzling or taking bribes, then definitely the people will trust the government.”

Even for skeptics of Mr. Noor, the success of his approach in Mazar-i-Sharif is hard to ignore. While insurgents remain active in two districts of the province, this city has emerged as an investment haven and has become one of the largest sources of revenue in the country, according to the Finance Ministry.

Provincial leaders and businessmen attribute the improved security here to Mr. Noor’s skill in maintaining good community relations and to his deep knowledge of the region’s intricate patchwork of tribes and loyalties, earned during his years as a military commander in the north.

Mr. Noor joined the mujahedeen to fight the Soviet occupation at 16 and commanded hundreds of fighters against the Taliban by 2001. Today he maintains personal contacts with district, tribal and former mujahedeen leaders who cooperate on intelligence, according to an aide, Qari Qudratullah.

Mr. Noor, who is from Mazar-i-Sharif, knows everyone, including the thieves and gangsters, Nader Nadery, deputy head of the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission, said. While protecting some, Mr. Nadery added, Mr. Noor has gained popularity by catching thieves and returning stolen goods to their owners.

Dr. Muhammad Afzal Hadeed, a surgeon and the newly elected head of the provincial council, said: “He had good relations with the people, and the people are cooperating with him. These two factors made it work.”

In the farming district of Balkh, west of Mazar-i-Sharif, the mainly Pashtun residents said security had vastly improved in the last five years. Businessmen, some of whom have moved from the south to invest in Mazar-i-Sharif, say they can do business here without fear of the kidnapping and extortion that plagues the capital. The governor, whose father was a fur and rug trader, is pro-business, they say.

“The first thing he did was to eliminate poppy and smuggling and attract businessmen,” said Sayed Mohammad Taher Roshanzada, head of the chamber of commerce in Mazar-i-Sharif. “His slogan is, ‘Make money and spend it here.’ ”

In Hairatan, a shabby river port on the northern border with Uzbekistan, brand new fuel storage tanks and a new railway line, Afghanistan’s first, are spreading out amid the desert scrub.

The port is now the entry point for 80 percent of Afghanistan’s fuel imports, including up to half of the fuel supplies for American and NATO forces, said Muhammad Ayub Ghazanfar, an ethnic Uzbek whose family business is the region’s biggest importer of fuel and foodstuffs.

Much of that business has come north because of attacks on convoys through Pakistan, he added. “The only reason for Mazar’s progress,” he said, “is because of the security.”

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#6 User is offline   asif1986 Icon

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 12:19 PM

http://timesofindia....how/8067335.cms

NATO supply route blocked as Imran Khan leads 2-day sit-in

ISLAMABAD: Thousands of people, led by Pakistani cricketer-turned politician Imran Khan, on Saturday blocked the main supply route for NATO troops in neighbouring Afghanistan to protest against the US drone strikes in the restive tribal regions.

Several opposition and Islamist groups as wells as tribal elders have backed the protest led by Imran, the chief of Tehrik-e-Insaf party (justice movement).

"I congratulate the people on the successful protest," Imran said
, adding the people of Pakistan will continue to protest unless the US halts the strikes targeting the people.

He demanded that the government shut down the NATO supplies through Pakistan.

"Pakistan will not be made a servant of the United States," he said, asking the government to quit the US-led efforts to combat the terrorism.

He said the anti-US protest will gain momentum in the coming days.

Campaigners against the drone strikes from Waziristan region have also joined the protest, amid fast growing opposition to the US attacks.

The protest comes just a day after two US drone aircraft rained missiles into North Waziristan tribal region which killed 25 people, including women and children, according to tribesmen in the region.

The protestors blocked the Khyber Pass, the main supply route for NATO troops in the neighbouring Afghanistan, on the outskirts of Peshawar, the capital of Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa province.

The protest forced the authorities to suspend for two days the supplies for nearly 150,000 US-led foreign forces.

Officials said that nearly 70 per cent of NATO supplies are transported through Pakistan, the most risky but shorter supply route.

Anger runs high in Pakistan against the US drone strikes in the Waziristan tribal region, which CIA considers as the base for al-Qaida and Afghan Taliban militants for planning attacks across the border into Afghanistan.

Despite the public resentment and Pakistan's protest, the US administration has rejected any possibility to halt the drone strikes. The message was conveyed this month to the ISI chief, Lt Gen Ahmed Shuja Pasha, when he met with the CIA boss in the US

Suspected militants regularly attack NATO trucks in Pakistan, which has also forced the US to sign agreements with Russia for alternate supply route.

The protestors will continue the sit-in till Sunday and the organisers said they would announce future strategy at the conclusion of the protest.
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#7 User is offline   Sohrab Icon

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 12:37 PM

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
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Posted 24 April 2011 - 12:37 PM

wellcome back shino, where have you been this long?
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#9 User is offline   قزلباش Icon

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 07:28 PM

Ive started to notice how everyone in Pakistan seems to have "Khan" somewhere in their name
The only "Khan" in my family is a 6'5'' Lur who is effectively the most influential man in northwest Khuzestan. We call him Hassan Qoli Khan.
We have no other Khans and we use that title extremely sparingly.

Every ex-hindu nobody in Pakistan seems to be a Khan. lol
هیچ وقت به خدا نگو یه مشکل بزرگ دارم
به مشکل بگو من یه خدای بزرگ دارم


Go tell the wolves that although the father has been killed,
The father's gun is with us still
Tell them that although all the men of the tribe have been killed,
There is a young boy in the cradle still

Bakhtiari Proverb
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#10 User is offline   Parsistani Icon

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 08:04 PM

The title is wide-spreaden in eastern Iran and the sub-continent. Every elder, land owner, dehqan or wrstler etc. can get the title Khan. Note also that Pakistan and India became in the middle age the centre of Turks and other eastern Asian people. Alone during the Mughals of India more than 1 mio. Turks and Mongols moved to the sub-continent.
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#11 User is offline   قزلباش Icon

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 08:19 PM

View PostParsistani, on 25 April 2011 - 03:04 PM, said:

The title is wide-spreaden in eastern Iran and the sub-continent. Every elder, land owner, dehqan or wrstler etc. can get the title Khan. Note also that Pakistan and India became in the middle age the centre of Turks and other eastern Asian people. Alone during the Mughals of India more than 1 mio. Turks and Mongols moved to the sub-continent.


That is interesting

It think among all the Qizilbash in Iran we have 200-300 Khans. Even the Khan can only pass his title to only his eldest son.
I am not a Khan because my paternal granfather is the second born son in the family.
My mother is the niece of a Khan but that, of course, also doesnt count.

I recently found out that my cousin is getting engaged to the son of one of the most important Bakhtiari Khans (the khan of the Duraki) and we are very happy because this will help my family's position alot. Their son will be the Khan of the Duraki bakhtiaris.
No amount of money can buy rank and the only way to gain rank is marriage.

Its sad because my male descendants will never be Khans.
In the past, the Qajar kings could grant the title to others and,in some cases, people like Karim Khan won the title themselves.

Recently, people have started to forget about these titles and they dont pay attention to them. Its somewhat convuluted because my khan (Hassan Khan) has almost no money but i am still his subject. I dont object to it and everytime I go to Iran i tell him that im his servant.
هیچ وقت به خدا نگو یه مشکل بزرگ دارم
به مشکل بگو من یه خدای بزرگ دارم


Go tell the wolves that although the father has been killed,
The father's gun is with us still
Tell them that although all the men of the tribe have been killed,
There is a young boy in the cradle still

Bakhtiari Proverb
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#12 User is offline   shinno Icon

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 10:32 PM

View PostSohrab, on 24 April 2011 - 01:37 PM, said:

wellcome back shino, where have you been this long?


Thank you, I've been working and studying and this forum was very slow so i took a break.
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